Jerusalem community – Sustainable Jerusalem http://sustainable-jerusalem.org/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 19:02:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-12.png Jerusalem community – Sustainable Jerusalem http://sustainable-jerusalem.org/ 32 32 Hanukkah at home: the holidays turn into a community builder | News, Sports, Jobs https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/hanukkah-at-home-the-holidays-turn-into-a-community-builder-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 05:47:52 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/hanukkah-at-home-the-holidays-turn-into-a-community-builder-news-sports-jobs/ Photos provided Lisa Shats of Wheeling said her family were big on Hanukkah – a holiday that celebrates the re-dedication of the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem some 2,200 years ago – to create a sense of community in their new hometown. It could mean a photo booth or Hanukkah socks depending on the theme chosen. […]]]>

Photos provided Lisa Shats of Wheeling said her family were big on Hanukkah – a holiday that celebrates the re-dedication of the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem some 2,200 years ago – to create a sense of community in their new hometown. It could mean a photo booth or Hanukkah socks depending on the theme chosen. What remains constant are the culinary skills of her husband, Dr Daniel Shats. He prepares traditional holiday dishes such as latkes as well as Mediterranean treats such as falafel and shawarma. A year without COVID, he sometimes cooks up to 150 guests.

By NORA EDINGER

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WHEELING – Hanukkah is not a particularly important event in Jewish life. Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashanah, and Passover tend to be headlining. But when Lisa Shats and her family moved to the city nearly a decade ago in search of a better work-life balance, especially for her doctor husband, she said that a holiday that indicated what made them different had become an ironic bond with the community.

The Shatse, now a family of four, are known for the vibrant Hanukkah celebrations whose treats range from matzo dumpling soup and latkes for 150 guests to husband, Dr. Daniel Shats, who cooks up Mediterranean classics such than 50-pound falafel or roast beef.

Not a family to object to a good big party, Shats said their whoop to do Hanukkah had a deeper purpose. Perhaps for several purposes.

“We don’t have blood from here,” Shats said of directly solving one of the challenges of moving comparatively solo to a city dominated by close family networks.

Indeed, they do not. Shats is the descendant of immigrants from Ellis Island who began their American life in New York. She grew up in Miami Beach and has also lived in urban centers such as New York, Boston, and Philadelphia. Her husband Daniel Shats – a regional gastroenterologist – is originally from Toronto, Ont., Where he emigrated from Russia with his parents when he was little.

Wheeling wasn’t even on their radar until it became clear that mixing a high pressure urban medical career with a family was more high pressure than they wanted. The couple and their son Gabe, a recent bar mitzvah boy who was a preschooler at the time, decided to try a brief internship here while considering a new path in life.

While driving Bethany Pike with a real estate agent, however, Shats was stunned at what they found. “Is there a temple?” Is there a country club? Is there a complex? she said she practically screamed as they traveled north of town. “I said ‘only three years’ and then we fell in love with it.”

FOOD AND FUN

Not to say that there were no adjustments. Having never lived outside a large population center, the couple went into a shock of ethnic and food depravity, Shats joked. Kind of.

“That’s why my husband pretty much became a chef,” Shats said with another laugh, curled up on a couch in an open plan kitchen and living room that, before COVID, was the center of their parties. “It’s everyday, a new cooking appliance arrives at home.

It wasn’t that long ago that it was a shawarma, she noted, adding that their parties tended to have themes in addition to traditional holiday treats such as latkes – which they are for. now depend on the frozen variety of Trader Joe’s after realizing that it is almost impossible to grate. enough potatoes for 150 guests.

Loaded with lamb, the spinning grill most often seen in restaurants revolving around the house, Shats laughed. “He was cutting it off and serving gyroscopes.”

Another time, when the fat from a 50-pound roast beef strayed into the oven, a warning system went off in the middle of the party. When the fire department arrived, “My husband, he said, ‘Come in, eat, have a drink.’

Shats said she gives out Hanukkah socks more often, works with a cartoonist or photo booth, or runs with a broomstick – her side of the culinary market and a necessity when the holidays get this big. “I’m cleaning up. It’s only fair, but he uses all the pots and all the utensils.

COMMUNITY LOCATION

The way a new network of friends responded to the holidays solved another difficulty that the family – which grew after the move to include her daughter Zoe, now 8 years old – discovered, he said. -she adds.

“He (Wheeling) has a very small Jewish community,” Shats said, comparing his children’s experience to his in Miami Beach. There she grew up attending school with mostly other Jewish children (ironically, at a private school run by a Presbyterian church) and surrounded by a family that celebrated the same Jewish holidays.

The Shats realized that Wheeling is a Christmas town and it would likely leave their kids out of the way unless they decided to go the same way, but differently. “We thought, we’ve got the food thing down,” so why not?

It wasn’t a problem that most of their guests were not Jewish, Shats said of introducing foods, traditions such as dreidel spinning and gelt (often pieces of chocolate wrapped in gold foil) and even the decor.

Its holiday reserve – blue, white and silver in a nod to the Israeli flag – includes a Star of David and candles reminiscent of the oil lamp that sparkled the holidays and that was used in dedication and restoration. of the temple in Jerusalem about 2,200 years ago.

There is also a Mensch on a bench instead of an elf on a shelf.

Noting that she is stunned by the efforts of Christmas celebrants who move such elves around the house to entertain their children, Shats joked that the family’s mensch lived up to its name, which is in Yiddish. for a good, honorable person. “He comes out, he sits on the coat, that’s all.”

The guests – now friends – are livelier, she added. The Shats were hit, for example, when a new friend offered a book celebrating the differences, “Dear, Santa Claus, Love, Rachel Rosenstein,” and another learned a Hebrew prayer to better engage with them. festivities.

And, beyond Hanukkah, Shats said they were amazed at how their new community reached out after the murder of 11 Jewish worshipers at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh.

“It made me feel safe and I think it really matters in the day right now,” Shats said. “All you want to do is protect your kids… There’s no place or community like Wheeling, W.Va. You really can’t get that anywhere else.”

In turn, Shats – who views her family as culturally more Jewish than religious, even though they are active at Shalom Temple – said she is also trying to interpret their life path for the community at large. She is visiting her daughter’s elementary school to share information on holidays such as Chanukah, the 2021 celebration of which begins tonight and continues until sunset on December 6.

“I feel like it’s my responsibility… our responsibility as a Jewish people,” she said, noting that party foods and even something as simple as pieces of chocolate have tendency to erase cultural differences.

With that in mind, as their Hanukkah festivities are scaled back for a second year due to COVID, Shats said she believes her husband is already planning a way to bring even more to the table in 2022. That will likely include small, jelly-filled donuts called sufganiyah which are also traditional.

Ticking off the foods they’ve already thrown on the Wheeling party scene, Shats nodded resolutely, no doubt anticipating other kitchen gear along the way. “What else is there?”

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Orchestra presents a holiday concert with twist | Community https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/orchestra-presents-a-holiday-concert-with-twist-community/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 14:30:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/orchestra-presents-a-holiday-concert-with-twist-community/ The Southern Finger Lakes Orchestra announces the return of the annual holiday concert on Saturday, December 11 at 4 p.m. at the Clemens Center in Elmira. Originally slated to perform at the 25th OSFL Season Finale in May 2020, aerial violinist Janice Martin will add a new twist to this timeless holiday tradition. Martin wowed […]]]>

The Southern Finger Lakes Orchestra announces the return of the annual holiday concert on Saturday, December 11 at 4 p.m. at the Clemens Center in Elmira.

Originally slated to perform at the 25th OSFL Season Finale in May 2020, aerial violinist Janice Martin will add a new twist to this timeless holiday tradition. Martin wowed millions of viewers on NBC’s “America’s Got Talent” in 2009 and has her own “The Janice Martin Cirque Show” in residence at the Americana Theater in Branson, Mo. She will perform Vivaldi’s Winter from “The Four Seasons, Carmen Sarasate’s Fantasy, a Christmas violin medley and Tchaikovsky’s favorite Holiday Nutcracker suite.

In addition, OSFL will perform the world premiere of Polina Nazaykinskaya’s “The Tales of Sorrow”, which was commissioned by OSFL for its 25th anniversary in 2020. Other selections on the program include two Poles from Rimsky-Korsakov and Tchaikovsky, “Fantasia” on Wendel’s Yaroushalaim Shel Zahv (Golden Jerusalem), a mix of holiday favorites, and ending with the festive OSFL interpretation of Leroy Anderson’s Sleigh Ride.

OSFL will adhere to COVID guidelines from the Clemens Center, which requires masks for all members of the public, regardless of their immunization status.

For tickets, visit https://clemenscenter.org or call 607-734-8191.


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Metro and Manchester Evening News apologize to Jewish community https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/metro-and-manchester-evening-news-apologize-to-jewish-community/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 16:55:55 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/metro-and-manchester-evening-news-apologize-to-jewish-community/ The Manchester Evening News and Metro both apologized separately on Tuesday for posting coverage that drew complaints from the Jewish community. The headline on page 12 of the MEN, in its global news section, read: “Palestinian shot dead after killing of holy place. On Sunday, a Hamas gunman opened fire in the streets of Jerusalem’s […]]]>

The Manchester Evening News and Metro both apologized separately on Tuesday for posting coverage that drew complaints from the Jewish community.

The headline on page 12 of the MEN, in its global news section, read: “Palestinian shot dead after killing of holy place.

On Sunday, a Hamas gunman opened fire in the streets of Jerusalem’s Old City (pictured below), killing an Israeli and injuring several others. The gunman was shot dead by the police.

The MEN said in a declaration online: “In today’s MEN newspaper, we made international headlines following a deadly attack in Jerusalem.

“We recognize that the title did not reflect the story in a precise and balanced way. We apologize wholeheartedly for any inconvenience caused. “

The apology came after the Jewish Representative Council for Greater Manchester and the Region said it had written to MEN editor Darren Thwaites asking for an urgent meeting.

He said he was “appalled” by the headline, adding: “The framing of the headline and the article that followed does not recklessly reflect the tragic incident.”

Additionally, the Jewish Chronicle reported that Marie van der Zyl, chair of the Council of Deputies of British Jews, described the headline as “a very misleading reversal of what happened” and hoped for a significant correction.

“The incident in question saw a Hamas terrorist kill an Israeli civilian and wound four others, before being neutralized by the Israeli police,” she added.

Meanwhile, Metro editor Ted Young apologized for posting a letter claiming former Yorkshire cricketer Azeem Rafiq was not racist when he tweeted anti-Semitic because he belongs to a minority and the Jews are a “privileged majority”.

Telegraph columnist and former Theresa May advisor in Issue 10, Nick Timothy, said the comments were “stupid and bogus, but why is the Metro publishing someone who excuses racism without question?” “

David Baddiel, who wrote the book Jews Don’t Count, which examines why anti-Semitism is seen as a lesser form of racism, said it was “astonishing how uncontested these comments are.”

Young noted on Twitter: “The MetroTalk page is carefully edited with all kinds of views coming from all over the country…

“Our readers always challenge views that are clearly flawed in the direction of the debate. But in hindsight, it shouldn’t have made the page. Apologies. “

He also confirmed that an apology would be published in Wednesday’s newspaper.

“We get a lot of views from across the country every day and it should never have happened,” Young told Baddiel.

Rafiq told the Jewish News last week that he was “very sorry” for the comments, made when he was 19, and that he was “very angry with myself”.

Photo: Menahem Kahana / AFP via Getty Images

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Springfield Jewish Community Center extends Hanukkah celebrations https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/springfield-jewish-community-center-extends-hanukkah-celebrations/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/springfield-jewish-community-center-extends-hanukkah-celebrations/ SPRINGFIELD – Chanukah, commonly known as the Festival of Lights, is a great time for holiday food, entertainment, and celebration of Judaism. The eight-day celebration reminiscent of the consecration of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in antiquity and the one-day supply of oil that lasted for eight days to mark this was less robust last […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD – Chanukah, commonly known as the Festival of Lights, is a great time for holiday food, entertainment, and celebration of Judaism.

The eight-day celebration reminiscent of the consecration of the Second Temple in Jerusalem in antiquity and the one-day supply of oil that lasted for eight days to mark this was less robust last year as rallies continued to be a high risk for the pandemic virus. However, the vaccine rollout has helped the in-person celebrations return, and the Springfield Jewish Community Center’s expanded Hanukkah 2021 program combines virtual and on-site events.

“Over the past few years it has been difficult to come together as a community to celebrate Hanukkah, so this year we are trying to provide our communities with more opportunities than ever before,” said Samantha Dubrinsky, Executive Director by JCC.

Dubrinsky noted that the illumination of the first branch of the sacred eight-branched candelabra, or menorah, would still take place on the first night of Hanukkah, Sunday, November 28, but that in addition to the “First Light” event of 5 at 5:45 pm there are “three new programs for families and adults”.

This means that the JCC celebration begins on Sunday, November 21, the weekend before the start of Hanukkah, which is always the 25th day of Kislev in the Hebrew calendar, with “Hanukkah in the Hay” from 10 am to noon on campus. center at 1160 Dickinson St. The event, free to the public, includes a petting zoo, bouncy houses and crafts.

“It has been so difficult for parents during the pandemic, and we wanted to give parents an outlet for their children,” said Seth Stutman, JCC director of marketing and membership. “Kids love petting zoos and inflatables, and we’re also excited that our new PJ Library Engagement Coordinator is there to provide books for the kids at the event.”

He added, “As a community center, it’s part of our mission to improve the lives of families, and these days we’re excited to have a free event where everyone can enjoy the vacation together.”

Stutman said the JCC is also keeping the Hanukkah closing night with “Last Light: Vodka & Latkes,” Sunday, December 5, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the JCC, and a virtual concert from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on the last day. , Monday December 6.

“We wanted to create an event for adults that was safe, engaging and different,” Stutman said of “Last Light” for ages 21 and over. “We will prepare the event with light aperitifs and a few festive cocktails. Chanukah is a holiday, and we wanted to find different ways to celebrate the eight nights of Chanukah.

Stutman said the virtual concert is the broadcast of a recently filmed “family Hanukkah concert” in Northampton.

“It plays for TCGs around the world who might want to be involved,” Stutman said. “Our very own Jewish educator, Elise Barber, will join Grammy nominee Mister G on stage for an international celebration.”

The concert is free. The cost to attend “Last Light” is $ 20; $ 15 for CCC members. Registration is required for both and can be done online where there is also information about the annual TCG Hanukkah Pickleball Tournament.

Stutman added that last year’s “First Light” was a “subdued and hybrid” event.

“We lit our menorah with a small crowd of clergy and simultaneously broadcast the event to over 150 people across the country,” Stutman said of the candelabra which represents the eight days the oil was on. burnt.

He noted that this year’s lighting ceremony for what is billed as the largest outdoor menorah in western Massachusetts is once again an event the public can attend at the start of Chanukah, and that a illumination is added throughout the eighth night.

“While ‘First Light’ and ‘Last Light’ will be our flagship events during the Hanukkah Run, at J we have different people lighting the menorah every night,” Stutman said. “From our staff and students at the Early Learning Center, to our elders and special needs populations, we serve so many groups who want to light the menorah, and we each take a night. “

He added: “We hope everyone can enjoy some or all of our festivities.”

“The public is always invited to our events, regardless of their background,” said Stutman. “Our JCC members, who are a diverse group, will also be joining us for these events. While the pandemic has made big events difficult, we are excited to bring more and smaller events to reach more and more people. “

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Chester County Library System: 2022 Community Reading with Longwood Gardens https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/chester-county-library-system-2022-community-reading-with-longwood-gardens/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 19:20:26 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/chester-county-library-system-2022-community-reading-with-longwood-gardens/ November 19, 2021 The Chester County Library System is delighted to partner again with Longwood Gardens for Community Reading 2022. This is the 8th Annual Community Reading – a program designed to encourage reading for fun and start a conversation . In 2022, we encourage our community readers to explore the concept of trees as […]]]>

November 19, 2021

The Chester County Library System is delighted to partner again with Longwood Gardens for Community Reading 2022. This is the 8th Annual Community Reading – a program designed to encourage reading for fun and start a conversation . In 2022, we encourage our community readers to explore the concept of trees as great connectors to nature, and how trees can help us better understand ourselves and our place in the world.

In our featured title, The song of the trees, travels with David Haskell as he repeatedly visits a dozen trees in cities from Manhattan to Jerusalem, forests (Amazonian, North American and boreal) and areas on the frontlines of environmental change, including coasts eroding, scorched mountain sides and war zones. In each place, it shows how human history, ecology and well-being are intimately linked to the life of trees.

For our younger readers, learn the importance of taking care of the environment and each other as two young families in two very different parts of the world each plant a tree in We planted a tree, by Diane Muldrow.

Do you know a young person who is considering a career in tree science? Follow eight budding tree advocates on their professional journeys and see firsthand what it takes to be a tree scientist in the graphic novel, Canopy Career Columns. In partnership with the Arboretum de Morton, Canopy Career Columns provides resources and tips to get you started in exploring your career.

We look forward to the launch of Community Reading 2022 and the many programs and events our libraries will be sponsoring. For more information, see their website: https://longwoodgardens.org/education/community-read/community-read-2022


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North Adams Welcomes Menorah Lighting | Community news https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/north-adams-welcomes-menorah-lighting-community-news/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 19:28:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/north-adams-welcomes-menorah-lighting-community-news/ NORTH ADAMS, Mass. – The annual lighting for the North Adams Menorah will take place at 5:00 p.m. on Sunday, November 28. The public is invited to attend this ceremony to be held at Dr. Arthur Rosenthal Square on West Main Street across from City Hall, with Rabbi Rachel Barenblat sharing a few words to […]]]>

NORTH ADAMS, Mass. – The annual lighting for the North Adams Menorah will take place at 5:00 p.m. on Sunday, November 28. The public is invited to attend this ceremony to be held at Dr. Arthur Rosenthal Square on West Main Street across from City Hall, with Rabbi Rachel Barenblat sharing a few words to mark the start of Chanukah. The children present will receive a small chocolate gelt treat.

Commenting on the spirit of the celebration, Rabbi Rachel Barenblat said, “Chanukah is a celebration of light in dark times and the miracle of finding out that we have had enough – we are enough. Jewish tradition teaches that a candle does not decrease when it lights another flame. When we come together, our light is more than the sum of its parts. Join us as we light the first Chanukah lights in North Adams – bring the light of your presence, and together we will shine in the dark.

North Adams Mayor Tom Bernard said: “I was proud to associate with Rabbi Barenblat, the faithful of the Beth Israel congregation and the Jewish community of North Adams and the Northern Berkshires, as well as to goodwill members of the community to establish and maintain the tradition of menorah lighting. in the town of North Adams. Lighting up lights against darkness – and the miraculous hope that comes with this tremendous act of faith and belief, there can always be better days ahead – is a theme shared by many traditions. I look forward to sharing the light, hope and the Chanukah miracle with our community again this year.

The lights of the menorah, lit during the eight days of Chanukah, represent the miracle of the restoration of light in the temple in Jerusalem as it was rededicated in the second century BCE. Today, Chanukah lights are a reminder of light and hope during dark times.


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As violence rises in Arab community, PM says situation is finally resolved https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/as-violence-rises-in-arab-community-pm-says-situation-is-finally-resolved/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 13:30:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/as-violence-rises-in-arab-community-pm-says-situation-is-finally-resolved/ With violence in the Arab community showing no signs of abating, Prime Minister Naftali Bennett said on Monday the situation was being resolved after being previously ignored. “We are dealing properly with the problems that we have become accustomed to – [the idea] that nothing could be done about them, that they are chronic – […]]]>

With violence in the Arab community showing no signs of abating, Prime Minister Naftali Bennett said on Monday the situation was being resolved after being previously ignored.

“We are dealing properly with the problems that we have become accustomed to – [the idea] that nothing could be done about them, that they are chronic – issues that are usually dismissed, ”Bennett said at a panel meeting on violence in the Arab community.

“Crime in the Arab community, in particular … quantities of illegal weapons sufficient for a small army – the arsenal that has accumulated and expanded over many years, must be emptied,” Bennett said.

“We are making a critical effort across the country against arms and ammunition,” the prime minister added, apparently referring to the seizure of weapons and the arrest of dozens of shooters for the last time in what the police billed it as the largest gun raid in Israel’s history.

His comments came following a massive brawl between two families outside Soroka Medical Center in Beer Sheva on Sunday evening.

The mayor of the southern city said on Monday that the government had lost control of the situation.

The mayor of Beersheba, Ruvik Danilovich, holds a press conference in the municipality building on November 15, 2021 (Flash90)

“There is civilian terrorism invading the country. Someone has to come and speak to the Israeli public, ”Ruvik Danilovich said at a press conference. “I expected the Prime Minister and the Minister of Public Safety [Omer Barlev] to be [in Beersheba] this morning, because a very serious incident happened yesterday – a loss of control by the State of Israel.

“The Israeli government needs to wake up because the public is losing confidence,” Danilovich said.

Four people were injured in the brawl on Sunday, during which gunshots were heard, according to witnesses and footage from the scene.

Two of the injured men – who were stabbed – were treated in hospital for minor injuries. The couple are from the nearby Bedouin town of Rahat, police said. Two others were being treated for mild blunt trauma, the hospital said.

Eyewitnesses at the scene said dozens of young men were fighting and throwing stones, as gunfire was heard throughout the area. Police said officers arrested 19 suspects.

Earlier on Sunday, a man was killed and a second injured when they were shot dead at a construction site in the German colony neighborhood of Jerusalem, in what police reportedly considered a premeditated coup. Channel 12 news said all those involved were Palestinian residents of East Jerusalem.

According to Channel 12, police see the incident as an escalation of violence within the Arab community, with the shooting taking place in broad daylight in an upscale Jewish community west of the city.

A police officer at the scene of a shooting in Jerusalem on November 14, 2021 (Yonathan Sindel / Flash90)

Arab communities have seen an upsurge in violence in recent years, mainly due to organized crime.

Leaders and community members blame the police, who they say have failed to crack down on powerful criminal organizations and largely ignore the violence, which includes family feuds, mafia wars and violence against them. the women.

Government officials and civil society experts say violence in the Arab community is the product of decades of state neglect.

More than half of Israeli Arabs live below the poverty line. Their towns and villages often have crumbling infrastructure, poor public services and few job prospects, leading some young people to collaborate with organized crime.

In August, Bennett said the violence and crime in Arab Israeli communities was a “national calamity.”

Emanuel Fabian contributed to this report.

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World War Z Switch Review – But Why Tho? A community of geeks https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/world-war-z-switch-review-but-why-tho-a-community-of-geeks/ https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/world-war-z-switch-review-but-why-tho-a-community-of-geeks/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 15:00:40 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/world-war-z-switch-review-but-why-tho-a-community-of-geeks/ Reading time: 3 minutes The genre of zombie-killing video games hasn’t seen many innovations in recent memory, but for good reason. Since the release of Left for dead in 2008, zombie games sought to replicate the same successful formula, and Second World War is no different. Originally published in 2019 by Saber Interactive for PlayStation […]]]>
Reading time: 3 minutes

The genre of zombie-killing video games hasn’t seen many innovations in recent memory, but for good reason. Since the release of Left for dead in 2008, zombie games sought to replicate the same successful formula, and Second World War is no different. Originally published in 2019 by Saber Interactive for PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC, World War Z is now also available on Nintendo Switch.

World War Z is a horde mode zombie shooter that can support up to four players working together to kill massive hordes of zombies. While there is absolutely nothing groundbreaking about the game, the execution is very well done and the missions themselves are fun to play. The missions take you to places like Tokyo and Jerusalem, and each has its own unique look and feel. I think the variety of mission locations is what I enjoyed the most about the game itself, although nothing really stood out as ‘best in class’ compared to other similar games. like the one recently released.

The mechanics themselves are as simple as it gets, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. I especially liked the strategic aspect of setting up defensive positions to help fight the massive hordes. I never had a hard time deciding what to do, but it was nice to have more options than just “grab more ammo”. While the lack of creative changes to the gameplay might be a common criticism, I find it hard to think of things that could have been done to make the game really stand out. The gameplay of zombie horde games is definitely a case of “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”, and so I can’t exactly blame the developers for the lack of anything overwhelming.

While a large part of World War Z looks like a reskin from other similar games, the biggest difference is the sheer amount of zombies rushing at you in each mission. I’ve never really felt the same dread of being overrun by a massive horde on my screen in other games like this, so I was pretty impressed with the amount of Second World War. The lack of variety in zombies is a bit of a letdown, but again, I feel like it’s hard to create something ‘new’ here when so many other options have already been explored in the kind, and the ones that work really well.

Most of my time with World War Z has been devoted to comparing it to other similar games, whether unintentionally or not, but the real thing that makes it stand out is the fact that it works quite well on the Nintendo Switch. There are countless Left for dead clones available on PC and even other consoles, but being able to kill massive hordes by taking the subway or killing time at work is hard to ignore. The port is working quite well and I didn’t notice any major issues that made my time less than pleasant.

The other thing that does World War Z on the Switch that’s worth checking out is the amount of fun one can have with others. I don’t think I’ve ever embarked on a zombie game on my own; for me it’s always about teaming up with others instead of playing computer characters. Playing Second World War with friends, especially friends who don’t own a PC or other console, can be absolute fun. There is a serious lack of good zombie horde games on the platform, so in that regard, Second World War is a welcome addition.

World War Z may not do anything to really stand out in the genre, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a fun time. The core of the game is very basic and can sometimes feel like a simple rework of other similar games, but that shouldn’t stop anyone from checking it out. I would especially recommend it if you are looking for a zombie game on Switch, as this is probably the best option for you.

World War Z for Nintendo Switch is now available.

World War Z

7/10

TL; DR

World War Z may not do anything to really stand out in the genre, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a fun time. The core of the game is very basic and can sometimes feel like a simple rework of other similar games, but that shouldn’t stop anyone from checking it out. I would especially recommend it if you are looking for a zombie game on Switch, as this is probably the best option for you.


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Plan for Arab community discriminates against mixed towns – Mayor of Lod https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/plan-for-arab-community-discriminates-against-mixed-towns-mayor-of-lod/ https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/plan-for-arab-community-discriminates-against-mixed-towns-mayor-of-lod/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 20:34:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/plan-for-arab-community-discriminates-against-mixed-towns-mayor-of-lod/ Lod Mayor Yair Revivo on Thursday asked the High Court of Justice that the government’s five-year plan for the Arab sector apply to Arabs in mixed towns, and not just in Arab-only towns. The exclusion of Arabs who live in mixed towns such as Lod, Ramle, Acre and Haifa, and make up about 20% of […]]]>
Lod Mayor Yair Revivo on Thursday asked the High Court of Justice that the government’s five-year plan for the Arab sector apply to Arabs in mixed towns, and not just in Arab-only towns.

The exclusion of Arabs who live in mixed towns such as Lod, Ramle, Acre and Haifa, and make up about 20% of Israel’s Arab population, amounts to discrimination, Revivo argued.

“The Israeli government has decided to discriminate against the Arab population in mixed cities of Israel and deny them the right to improve their economic and social situation,” Revivo told Maariv.

“Despite petitions and demands from various government agencies and Prime Minister Naftali Bennett, the decision not to include Lod and the other mixed towns such as Acre and Ramle in the plan is a continuation of the current situation, a prejudice to these citizens and a disaster for both [mixed] the cities themselves and [its Arab] residents. I ask the High Court to step in and start an immediate discussion, ”he said.

Revivo’s petition called on the High Court both to hold an immediate hearing on the matter and to order the government to suspend the allocation of funds to Arab regional councils and municipalities, which is supposed to be completed 60 days after the entry into force of the law.

JEWS AND ARABS demonstrate together in Lod with signs reading “Together Against Violence” and “Refusing to be Enemies”, following a night of riots by Arab residents in the city in May. (credit: YOSSI ALONI / FLASH90)

The plan was approved by cabinet on October 24. It is allocating around 30 billion shekels between 2022 and 2026 to advance a series of actions aimed at reducing the gaps in Arab society.

These include some 9.4 billion shekels for educational programs; some 2.8 billion shekels for housing; 3 million shekels for transportation; more than NIS 1.4 billion to expand employment opportunities by increasing the number of courses for occupations in high demand, with emphasis on acquiring fluency in Hebrew; some NIS 615 million in social assistance programs; some 600 million shekels in high technology, and more.

Lod and Revivo consistently made headlines during Operation Guardian of the Walls in May, as the city saw some of the most intense violence and riots from its Arab population and Jewish organizations in far right.

The four days of riots left an Arab and a Jew killed, several people wounded by gunshots and stab wounds, four synagogues set on fire, a number of apartments set on fire and destroyed, dozens of cars set on fire and many windows smashed on cars, synagogues, mosques and shops.

Revivo has been accused by part of the Arab population of 28,000 people of implementing unequal policies, separating the two communities and inciting against the Arab population.

However, Revivo welcomed Raam Mansour Abbas’ leader to Lod Town Hall after the latter visited one of the burnt down synagogues, where the two spoke about the situation in Lod and inter-community relations among Arab residents. and Jews. Revivo thanked Abbas for his visit and called on Jews and Arabs in his city to restore their coexistence and cooperation.


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Buzz’d Coffee Comes to North Bellmore | Herald Community Newspapers https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/buzzd-coffee-comes-to-north-bellmore-herald-community-newspapers/ https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/buzzd-coffee-comes-to-north-bellmore-herald-community-newspapers/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/buzzd-coffee-comes-to-north-bellmore-herald-community-newspapers/ Frequent travelers to Bellmore Avenue between Sunrise Highway and Jerusalem Avenue may have noticed that the vacant lot, which once housed the Bellmore Dairy Barn, has recently undergone extensive renovations and now bears a new sign. Buzz’d Express Coffee, a new business with a novel approach to in-car coffee shops, will open its flagship location […]]]>

Frequent travelers to Bellmore Avenue between Sunrise Highway and Jerusalem Avenue may have noticed that the vacant lot, which once housed the Bellmore Dairy Barn, has recently undergone extensive renovations and now bears a new sign.

Buzz’d Express Coffee, a new business with a novel approach to in-car coffee shops, will open its flagship location in North Bellmore in mid-November. Owned by Greg Carmada of Massapequa, he told the Herald he envisioned his business while working in a cafe at the university.

“I had the idea to open a store – if you have seen other stores [like Starbucks or Dunkin’], the guidelines are wrong, ”Carmada said. “I had the idea to take dairy barns and make it a two-lane road.”

The two-lane driving concept envisioned by Carmada led to the idea that Buzz’d Coffee would be an “express”, driving only to a cafe. Converting the Bellmore Dairy Barn to a cafe allows for two lanes – one for ordering in person and one for picking up orders online.

Online orders can be placed in advance on their app – which will be up and running within the next two weeks, according to Camarda.

“I’ve done a lot of research over the past year,” he explained. “I was going to sit in a lane in the car and time myself – it sometimes took 15 to 25 minutes, start to finish.

“[Buzz’d] will have the quality of a coffee with the convenience of being express, ”he added. “It will be a little different, if we can.”

David Czegledi, a long-time acquaintance of the Carmada family, has been involved in the management of businesses and restaurants for several years, previously holding managerial positions at Ben’s Kosher Deli. Czegledi has been appointed CEO of Buzz’d, given that he has worked at the company, understands the market and can adequately help with networking, according to Carmada.

Czegledi posts frequently on Facebook, providing residents with updates on the construction project. In terms of working with the local community, plans for Buzz’d include blood drives, where in return for donating blood, customers would receive free coffee. Czegledi added that they have been in contact with the Bellmore Chamber of Commerce, other local businesses, as well as libraries to get their names known and establish themselves as part of the community.

“We want to give back to the community,” Czegledi explained. “We want to provide the best customer service and offer a high quality product from [both] coffee and food.

Buzz’d’s menu will include coffee and other drinks, as well as baked goods and food, especially for breakfast and lunch, Carmada explained. The menu will be accommodating, offering dairy and non-dairy options for drinks, as well as vegan and gluten-free items for those with restrictions or dietary preferences.

“We want to be able to accommodate everyone,” Czegledi said. “And, if anyone had a specific request, we’ll try to accommodate that.”

Prior to moving to the North Bellmore location, Carmada shared that they had examined about five or six closed dairy barns in Nassau County. His goal is to see Buzz’d spread throughout the county, the rest of Long Island, and possibly elsewhere. Taking over a location that had been vacant for some time, the response from the community was favorable to the idea of ​​a new business.

“It was a dumping ground,” Carmada said of the old dairy barn. “It was dirty, it smelled bad, it didn’t look good. The town of Hempstead was the easiest to work with.

“The responses we received [from the community] were great, ”added Czegledi. “People love it – we’ve heard a lot of ‘I can’t wait’. “

In the coming weeks, construction will continue on the site. Asphalt will be laid for the traffic lanes and landscaping will also be completed. The left lane will be for pickup controls and the right lane for in-person controls. Under the asphalt, there will be sensors in the ground that will indicate when a car has arrived, sending a signal to a worker’s helmet, Carmada explained. Inside the building, counters, refrigerators and other machinery should also be installed.

In addition to the building process, Czegledi explained that they were working to perfect their coffee blend.

“Southdown Coffee Roasters makes the blend for coffee,” Czegledi said. “[Southdown Coffee] is a specialized café on the North Shore [of Long Island]. “

“We have been working with them for months,” added Carmada. “Trying different tastes, blends – it’s been a learning experience. Coffee is a lot more complicated than you might think.

Weather permitting, in times of heavy traffic, Caramda said they could have workers in the lanes, direct traffic and take control.

“The reason we like the dual track so much is that we can respond to both sides – both customers,” he said. “If necessary, we can lead people on both sides. “

Community driven and community driven, Buzz’d still has vacancies, and according to Czegledi they’ve already hired local youth to cover after-school shifts.

“We have positions that would be perfect for students, moms [in the area] or the elderly, ”Czegledi said. “We have flexible working hours and are ready to work with them. It all depends on what people want – we want people to be happy, to come and stay.

“We want to be at the forefront of customer service,” added Czegledi. “We want to keep our customers happy. ”

For more information on Buzz’d, customers can call (516) 962-9674 and visit their website buzzdexpresscoffee.com. When they open, their hours will be 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday to Friday, and 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday to Sunday.


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