Jerusalem community – Sustainable Jerusalem http://sustainable-jerusalem.org/ Wed, 18 May 2022 17:29:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-12.png Jerusalem community – Sustainable Jerusalem http://sustainable-jerusalem.org/ 32 32 Dozens injured in clashes at Palestinian funeral in Jerusalem https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/dozens-injured-in-clashes-at-palestinian-funeral-in-jerusalem/ Tue, 17 May 2022 12:21:59 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/dozens-injured-in-clashes-at-palestinian-funeral-in-jerusalem/ Press (AFP) Jerusalem, undefined ● Tue 17 May 2022 2022-05-17 19:20 1 53ea05b5fe2e13733519dbf4e30da6a0 2 Community Palestine, Israel, shock, police, Jerusalem, funeral Free More than 70 Palestinians were injured in overnight clashes with Israeli forces at a funeral in Jerusalem, Palestinian medics said on Tuesday, in unrest that police said included “violent riots” that threatened the […]]]>

Press (AFP)

Jerusalem, undefined ●
Tue 17 May 2022

2022-05-17
19:20
1
53ea05b5fe2e13733519dbf4e30da6a0
2
Community
Palestine, Israel, shock, police, Jerusalem, funeral
Free

More than 70 Palestinians were injured in overnight clashes with Israeli forces at a funeral in Jerusalem, Palestinian medics said on Tuesday, in unrest that police said included “violent riots” that threatened the officers’ lives.

The unrest unfolded as Palestinians buried 23-year-old Walid al-Sharif, who died on Saturday from injuries sustained in clashes last month at the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound, a hotspot in Jerusalem.

The Palestinian Red Crescent Society says the injuries occurred ‘during clashes with occupation forces’, with Israeli police firing rubber bullets and stun grenades, in and around the annexed Old City of East Jerusalem by Israel.

Sharif’s body was carried by mourners through the Al-Aqsa compound and brought through Herod’s Gate in the Old City, before being buried in a nearby cemetery.

Police said “violent disturbances occurred during and after the funeral, including in the cemetery itself.” Six officers were injured.

“Israeli forces acted resolutely against hundreds of violent violators and rioters who … took violent action against the forces, putting their lives at risk,” a police statement said.

The Palestinians were “throwing rocks, bottles, bricks and other heavy objects, and firing fireworks at the forces”, he added.

The Palestinian Prisoners Club advocacy group said more than 50 people had been arrested.

Police put the number of arrests at 15.

The clashes erupted days after police raided the funeral procession of veteran Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh, who was shot dead in an Israeli army raid in the West Bank.

Palestinians and the TV station said Israeli troops killed her, while Israel said Palestinian fire may be to blame.

Anger over his death was heightened on Friday when baton-wielding Israeli police in annexed East Jerusalem beat pallbearers carrying Abu Akleh’s coffin which was draped in a Palestinian flag.

Israel Police said they would investigate the raid by officers on the funeral procession as Abu Akleh’s body was being taken from St. Joseph’s, a Catholic hospital in East Jerusalem.

The chaotic incident was strongly condemned around the world, including by the United States, the European Union, the United Nations and the Vatican.


]]>
Paterson NJ celebrates Palestine Way renaming in honor of community https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/paterson-nj-celebrates-palestine-way-renaming-in-honor-of-community/ Sun, 15 May 2022 22:44:56 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/paterson-nj-celebrates-palestine-way-renaming-in-honor-of-community/ PATERSON — The South Paterson neighborhood is home to shops, restaurants and offices with Palestinian flags and images of Jerusalem hanging on the walls. Signs of the Palestinian homeland are affixed to property names everywhere, from Jerusalem Pharmacy to Nablus Sweets to Palestine Hair Salon. Now visitors to the area will also find road signs. […]]]>

PATERSON — The South Paterson neighborhood is home to shops, restaurants and offices with Palestinian flags and images of Jerusalem hanging on the walls. Signs of the Palestinian homeland are affixed to property names everywhere, from Jerusalem Pharmacy to Nablus Sweets to Palestine Hair Salon.

Now visitors to the area will also find road signs. On Sunday, city officials celebrated the renaming of a five-block section of Main Street from Gould Avenue to Buffalo Avenue on Palestine Way.

“A lot of Palestinians live in Paterson, and this is the day we can celebrate it,” Councilman Alaa “Al” Abdelaziz said.

The city council voted unanimously in April to rename the street to honor the city’s large Palestinian community and their contributions to civic life and business. A lively street festival, organized by the Palestinian American Community Center, was held along Main Street to celebrate the occasion.

Paterson officials including Mayor Andre Sayegh, Paterson Council Chairperson Maritza Davila and Sixth Ward Councilman Al Abdelaziz react after unveiling the renaming of part of the main street to Palestine Way as they stand up in a ceremony, Sunday in Paterson 05/15/22.

Vendors set up stalls selling grilled corn, dresses, bags and more. T-shirts emblazoned with “Palestine Way” were available. Red, white, black and green Palestinian flags were distributed to participants and draped over buildings and tents.

“I wish we had something like this every year,” said Lina Ramadan, who was from Jordan and hadn’t been to Paterson in 22 years. She lived in Union City.

]]>
The Ground We Won: A Stunning Portrait of a Kiwi Community, Honestly Delivered https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/the-ground-we-won-a-stunning-portrait-of-a-kiwi-community-honestly-delivered/ Sat, 14 May 2022 23:50:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/the-ground-we-won-a-stunning-portrait-of-a-kiwi-community-honestly-delivered/ REVIEW: Miriam Smith and Christopher Pryor spent 12 months in 2011 and 2012 living with the nuns in Jerusalem/Hiruharama on the Whanganui River. The film they made – How Far Is Heaven – was an elegiac work. He continued to move and delight audiences around the world. Smith and Pryor reappeared in 2015 with a […]]]>

REVIEW: Miriam Smith and Christopher Pryor spent 12 months in 2011 and 2012 living with the nuns in Jerusalem/Hiruharama on the Whanganui River.

The film they made – How Far Is Heaven – was an elegiac work. He continued to move and delight audiences around the world.

Smith and Pryor reappeared in 2015 with a new film, again made after a year living locally, this time in the town of Reporoa, halfway between Taupō and Rotorua. Reporoa is home to a few thousand people, several thousand cows and some very proud rugby teams.

Smith and Pryor have been granted unprecedented access to the Senior A team – not just to the games, but also to the locker rooms, the beer-boozed bonding sessions, the parties and the homes of the men and women who keep the teams going and the city ​​alive.

ROBERT STEVEN/stuff.co.nz

Kelvin Thomas, one of many colorful characters featured in the Kiwi documentary The Ground We Won, talks about being constantly filmed and playing rugby.

READ MORE:
* The Velvet Queen: French snow leopard hunt that’s not your average “nature doc”
* The Marilyn Monroe Mystery: Netflix doco reminds us of its enduring appeal
* They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead: Netflix’s Surprisingly Good and Funny Doco Orson Welles
* Elizabeth: A Portrait in Parts: An Impressionist Collage of the Queen’s Life
* The Chills: The Triumph & Tragedy of Martin Phillips: Intimate tale hits DocPlay

The Ground We Won is unlike any New Zealand documentary I have ever seen.

The decision to shoot in black and white was inspired. Stripped of the expected greens and browns, rural New Zealand becomes an unfamiliar place – the perfect setting for such an unexpected story.

The Ground We Won is loud, funny, affectionate and sometimes shocking.

The Ground We Won is loud, funny, affectionate and sometimes shocking.

A lot happened that year. The team has had its share of wins and losses, new people have come to town, relationships have crumbled and new ones have arisen.

And, at the center of it, teammates Peanut, Slug, Broomy and Co. drink, talk, harangue and play all the ways these men learn to trust each other.

What happens on the pitch is important, but the film is about 80 minutes long on a Saturday afternoon. It’s a portrait of the community, delivered honestly. Unlike every other New Zealand film set in the spaces between cities, The Ground We Won doesn’t romance or mythologize people or places. And that’s what makes it so good.

What happens on the ground matters, but The Ground We Won is about 80 minutes long on a Saturday afternoon.

What happens on the ground matters, but The Ground We Won is about 80 minutes long on a Saturday afternoon.

The Ground We Won is loud, funny, affectionate and sometimes shocking. There’s ‘toxic masculinity’ here, if you’re looking for it, but also a lucid examination of how New Zealand raises its men.

Back in 2015, I called The Ground We Won “an instant national classic” — and I’ll leave it at that. If you want to understand rural New Zealand, The Ground We Won is a good place to start. Strongly recommended.

The Ground We Won is now available to stream on AroVision, Academy OnDemand, NZFilm OnDemand, DocPlay and Beamafilm.

]]>
Northeast News | Community outreach programs presented by Jerusalem Farm https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/northeast-news-community-outreach-programs-presented-by-jerusalem-farm-2/ Wed, 11 May 2022 00:04:57 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/northeast-news-community-outreach-programs-presented-by-jerusalem-farm-2/ Learn more about Jerusalem Farm at www.jerusalemfarm.org or by following their organization on Facebook – @JerusalemFarm. For any questions, call (816) 421-1855. In 2020, Jerusalem Farm helped coordinate the largest survey in the historic Northeast. We are continuing this project and we need your participation. This new survey was developed with the help of Northeast […]]]>
Learn more about Jerusalem Farm at www.jerusalemfarm.org or by following their organization on Facebook – @JerusalemFarm. For any questions, call (816) 421-1855.

In 2020, Jerusalem Farm helped coordinate the largest survey in the historic Northeast. We are continuing this project and we need your participation. This new survey was developed with the help of Northeast Kansas City residents, and the results will be presented to all residents.

This information will be shared with neighborhood associations, community organizations and the City of Kansas City to inform future investments. You can use this survey to influence the future of your neighborhood.

This survey is for residents of northeast Kansas City. It is intended for all adults aged 18 and over. All results are completely anonymous.

The 2020 survey results led to investments worth more than $300,000 in the Northeast to help residents with housing code violations. Be sure to make your voice heard this year!

If you have any questions or would like to help share this survey with a wider audience, contact trinidad@jerusalemfarm.org

Scan with your phone’s camera to take part in the survey. Only 15 minutes.




]]>
Augusta County Church Hosts Community Center Event https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/augusta-county-church-hosts-community-center-event/ Fri, 06 May 2022 00:09:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/augusta-county-church-hosts-community-center-event/ CHURCHVILLE, Va. (WHSV) – An Augusta County church is hosting an event this weekend to rally support for a Churchville community center. The Jerusalem Chapel Church in Churchville plans to build a new community center for the town. Last month they held an information session about the center, and this weekend they will host the […]]]>

CHURCHVILLE, Va. (WHSV) – An Augusta County church is hosting an event this weekend to rally support for a Churchville community center.

The Jerusalem Chapel Church in Churchville plans to build a new community center for the town. Last month they held an information session about the center, and this weekend they will host the Cornerstone for Christ Community Center Launch Event and Festival.

“I just want to have a good time with the fraternity, get the community involved and just rally around this community center, get people excited about it. This is an opportunity for us as a church to give something back to our community, a small event like this,” said senior pastor Mark Tinsley.

The event will take place on Saturday from 2-7 p.m. at Turtle Lane Farm on Hankey Mountain Highway in Churchville. Tinsley said they will have a band, games, cake walk, cornhole, clown and other activities at the event. The Saturday event is free.

He said the event is another way to raise awareness about the event and help the community understand what it is doing.

The community center will be a space where community organizations can hold meetings and gather since the Churchville area does not have a space like this.

Copyright 2022 WHSV. All rights reserved.

]]>
Assistance League Auxiliary has been busy in the community – Orange County Register https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/assistance-league-auxiliary-has-been-busy-in-the-community-orange-county-register/ Thu, 05 May 2022 18:20:48 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/assistance-league-auxiliary-has-been-busy-in-the-community-orange-county-register/ Members of the Anaheim Hills Auxiliary of the Assistance League Anaheim have had many worthwhile programs and supported several local philanthropic projects this club year. At the January meeting, guest speakers focused on the resources available for youth who are homeless or in foster care. Cristina Sanchez Keller of Project HERO, Homeless Education Resources Opportunities, […]]]>

Members of the Anaheim Hills Auxiliary of the Assistance League Anaheim have had many worthwhile programs and supported several local philanthropic projects this club year.

At the January meeting, guest speakers focused on the resources available for youth who are homeless or in foster care. Cristina Sanchez Keller of Project HERO, Homeless Education Resources Opportunities, shared some of the daunting and unique challenges that homeless and foster youth face on a daily basis and how this program ensures these students receive the necessary tools and support. to succeed in school. He is part of the Homeless Student Assistance Program in Anaheim through the Magnolia School District.

Additionally, Nancy Lewis of Seneca, Family of Agencies, introduced the new foster youth hotline; an invaluable resource for current and former foster youth and their caregivers, available 24/7 at 833-939-3877. She is currently an Equine Mental Health Worker for the organization’s Healing on Horseback Therapy Program at the Anaheim Hills Facility.

In February, members welcomed Kinsley Brittain, Vice President of Program Opportunities at My Day Counts, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping adults with developmental disabilities learn skills that enable them to live productive lives. The organization partners with various local businesses and community partners that provide both learning and integrated work opportunities.

Last month, members helped assemble spring bags at the Haskett Library branch filled with coloring books, crayons, toys and candies for children visiting the Haskett and Ponderosa libraries.

Other philanthropic projects included a sock drive for Grandma’s House of Hope, which helps children in need throughout Orange County. Members also held a food drive to help supplement the nonprofit’s pantry.

Networking with members, friends and community organizations and serving the community is part of The Auxiliary’s mission. Membership is open and meetings are held on Zoom at 7:30 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of the month, except July and December. For more information, visit Facebook.com/AnaheimHillsAuxiliary.

Women’s Connection has plans for May

The Women’s Connection of Anaheim, Orange and Villa Park is hosting a Mother’s Day celebration for their May 9 luncheon at Black Gold Golf Club. And all women are invited.

A fun and informative program will be presented by Tony Banzuelo who will demonstrate 40 ways to wear a headscarf. Singer Sheila Nicole will entertain guests and guest speaker Carole Osgrove will share her life story.

Doors open at 10:30 a.m. for shopping with on-site vendors, lunch and program follow at 11:30 a.m. There will be lots of raffles, newbie giveaways, and opportunity raffles.

The cost is $27 per person and those wishing to attend should call Barbi Zipperian at 714-280-9062 as soon as possible.

Anaheim Libraries Show Support for Adopted Children

May is Foster Family Awareness Month and to support it, the Anaheim Public Library is sponsoring a backpack and school supply drive. Community members are encouraged to participate by filling a new backpack with binders, paper, pencils, pens, glue and calculators and bringing them to neighborhood library branches, including the Canyon Hills Library.

According to City Librarian Audrey Lujan, Anaheim is the first library in Orange County to “offer a library card to people 18 and under living in the foster care system, group home, temporary living situation, homeless people or people without proof of residence”.

Donations will be collected through May 31 and will be given to Orangewood Foundation Samueli Academy students and university scholarship recipients. The community can also upgrade their own library card with the “We’re here for you” design for a donation that will also support the foster care program. For more information, contact the Canyon Hills Library at 714-765-6444 or visit Anaheim.net/library.

Women’s Club gets fashion ideas for spring

Members of the Anaheim Hills Women’s Club chose a Mother’s Day theme for their May 18 luncheon at the Anaheim Hills Golf Club. All women in the community are invited.

The day begins at 11 a.m. and will include a spring fashion show by Eileen Gerber.

The cost to attend is $33 and the reservation deadline is today. Contact Karon Kelleher at 714-912-4907 to make a reservation.

Canyon Hills Presbyterian plans vacation Bible school

Canyon Hills Presbyterian Church Children’s Ministry is sponsoring a vacation Bible school, “Jerusalem Marketplace,” from 9 a.m. to noon July 11-15 on the church’s campus.

All children ages 4 (potty cleaned) through sixth grade are welcome to attend. Registration is currently open.

Children will embark on a ‘walking’ journey on the path of Jesus through Jerusalem that incorporates fun daily activities, games, food, music and stories with this year’s theme.

The cost of participation is a flat rate of $25 per family. Teens who want to earn volunteer hours for school are welcome to help. For more information and/or to register, visit canyonhillspc.org.

Sharon Hlapcich writes about events and happenings in the Anaheim Hills area. Contact her by phone (714-998-4604 or email (smhlapcich@sbcglobal.net).

]]>
Assumption University, Jewish Federation of Windsor and Community Center Launch New Course https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/assumption-university-jewish-federation-of-windsor-and-community-center-launch-new-course/ Thu, 05 May 2022 18:00:20 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/assumption-university-jewish-federation-of-windsor-and-community-center-launch-new-course/ Assumption University, Jewish Federation of Windsor and Community Center Launch New Course Representatives of the Jewish and Catholic communities were present at the event. Assumption University Windsor and the Jewish Federation and Community Center of Windsor launched a new course titled “Jerusalem and Rome: Jewish-Catholic Relations” at an event at JCC Windsor on May 2. […]]]>
Assumption University, Jewish Federation of Windsor and Community Center Launch New Course

Representatives of the Jewish and Catholic communities were present at the event.

Assumption University Windsor and the Jewish Federation and Community Center of Windsor launched a new course titled “Jerusalem and Rome: Jewish-Catholic Relations” at an event at JCC Windsor on May 2.

The course marks a new chapter in Jewish-Catholic dialogue, teaching an appreciation of both religious traditions in hopes of inspiring other Jewish-Catholic communities in Canada and the United States.

Dan Brotman, Executive Director of the WJCC, and Dr. John Cappucci, Stephen Jarislowsky Professor of Religion and Conflict at Assumption University, signed a joint statement at the event and thanked each other to symbolize their friendship continues.

Jewish and Catholic prayers at the event were led by Rabbi Mike Nasielski of the WJCC and the father of Assumption University. Paul McGill, CSB, superior of the Basilian Fellows. Members of Windsor and the wider Jewish and Catholic communities also attended.

The course paints a portrait of Jewish-Catholic relations by exploring both historical interactions and contemporary developments between the two religions and their place in the wider community. The course will also explore similarities and differences in the lived expressions of Judaism and Catholicism.

The course aims to provide students with the space to explore approaches and strategies to help cultivate understanding, dialogue, and cooperation between Jewish and Catholic communities.

This will be a six-week crash course on Zoom from May 10 to June 24 on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11:30 a.m. to 2:20 p.m.

The course is available for credit or audit. Special transfer agreements have been made for many universities in Canada, as well as the University of Michigan and Wayne State University.

For Nasielski, the course is particularly unique in that it presents Jewish-Catholic relations primarily through a Catholic university, but with much input from Jewish sources and guest lecturers, including himself.

“It takes this mission to help Catholics and other non-Jews understand Judaism, but it’s important to present it from a Jewish perspective,” Nasielski said. “It ensures that the Jewish perspective is expressed by real, living Jewish people and that it’s not just ‘the Jews’.”

For Cappucci, the course is a historic moment and a major step forward in Jewish-Catholic relations.

“You have a Catholic university and a Jewish federation working together on a topic of mutual interest and mutual benefit in education for the community, I’m very excited about that,” Cappucci said. “I hope (students) will be inspired to see that Jews and Catholics are not as different as everyone is beginning to think, that their similarities outweigh their differences. I really hope that the next generation of students will start to think in those terms rather than see an us versus them dichotomy.

For more information and/or to register, visit https://assumptionu.ca/jerusalem_and_rome/

]]>
Community Memories May 6, 2022 | Community https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/community-memories-may-6-2022-community/ Thu, 05 May 2022 05:25:32 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/community-memories-may-6-2022-community/ Brandeis National Committee (BNC) Phoenix Chapter Installs Leadership At its annual spring event, the BNC Phoenix Chapter installed Ellen Widoff and Leith Baletin as co-chairs to lead the 1,000+ member organization, one of the largest chapters in the nation. Baletin became the organization’s first male president and today 25% of Phoenix members are male. The […]]]>

Brandeis National Committee (BNC) Phoenix Chapter Installs Leadership

At its annual spring event, the BNC Phoenix Chapter installed Ellen Widoff and Leith Baletin as co-chairs to lead the 1,000+ member organization, one of the largest chapters in the nation. Baletin became the organization’s first male president and today 25% of Phoenix members are male.

The term of the BNC Phoenix Board of Trustees will coincide with the 75th anniversary of Brandeis University; BNC Phoenix began as a founding chapter in 1950. Today, it is recognized as the flagship chapter of the BNC community due to its regular achievement awards and flagship program, the Book and Author Event, established in 1991. This event welcomed more than 950 participants before the pandemic.

Although most members are not Brandeis graduates, membership offers the opportunity to support the only non-sectarian Jewish-founded institution of higher learning in the United States, a leading neurodegenerative disease research campus and to encourage an impressive number of alumni who have positively changed our world in multiple ways, including by participating in the COVID -19 vaccine.

For more information, visit brandeisphoenix.org.

Larry Moffitt to receive Harry Adler Memorial Leadership Award from JFL

Arizona Jewish Free Loan (JFL) announced that Larry Moffitt will receive the Harry Adler Memorial Leadership Award at JFL’s Gratitude Gathering on May 15, 2022.

The Harry Adler Memorial Leadership Award is given to current or past members of the Board of Directors who have followed Adler’s example by going beyond their role to set an example for other volunteers and ensure that JFL will be there for future generations. Moffitt exemplified these ideals both in his professional life as a CPA and in his service at JFL. He has served as a member of the board of directors, chairman of the board of directors and accounting consultant.

“I was touched when I was informed that I was the recipient of the Harry Adler Memorial Leadership Award,” Moffitt said. “I know the importance of the award and the time and deliberation that the board devotes to selecting the recipient. It is all the more significant for me that it was Harry Adler who encouraged me to get involved in Jewish Free Loan. How right he was; it was an extremely rewarding trip.

The Gratitude Gathering will take place as a hybrid event and will include an update on JFL’s impact, the presentation of the Harry Adler Memorial Leadership Award and the installation of the new Board of Directors. To register, go to bit.ly/JFLGratitude2022.

Up-and-coming artists share productions in development at the Festival of New American Theater

The Phoenix Theater Company continues its longstanding commitment to the development of new works, playwrights and performers with the 24th Festival of New American Theater taking place May 6-8 and May 13-15, 2022.

The festival will feature readings of two new musicals and a play, as well as the addition of the Lyrical Composer Cabaret and Choreography Lab. The Festival is an opportunity for the public to see how a production goes from page to stage. The three productions are presented without staging, without costumes or choreography. It is not uncommon for parts of a production to be re-read and for real-time editing to be done on stage during workshops.

“At The Phoenix Theater Company, we are proud to be a conduit for new stories, new voices, and new contributions to the American theatrical canon,” said Michael Barnard, Production Artistic Director. “We know the value of the creative process and the importance of providing a space for new artists of all kinds to see their work come to life on stage.”

The First Draft series returns to the festival, featuring seated readings of three different one-act plays that competed and won Spotlight Youth Theater’s 2021-2022 Playfest, an annual playwriting competition for young adults. Selections include “Not Driving Ever Summer” by Rebecca Bain, “The Pickpocket’s Lament” by Katie Kloberdanz and “Lost n’ Sound” by Zoey Waller. These new works will be presented on May 14 at 11 a.m. and May 15 at 11 a.m.

One of the readings of the developing New American Theater includes “A Beautiful Place”. This new musical celebrates the life of artist Friedl Dicker-Brandeis, who was deported to Theresienstadt concentration camp in 1942. There Friedl secretly taught classes to hundreds of children, giving them the opportunity to escape the world around them using their imaginations and the remarkable power of art. This musical can be seen on stage on May 6 at 7 p.m. and May 7 at 3 p.m.

For more information or to obtain tickets, visit phoenixtheatre.com.

Israeli college president visits Jewish community in Phoenix

When Jerusalem College of Technology (JCT) President Professor Chaim visited Phoenix in March, he reconnected with a Jewish community he has known for nearly 50 years.

“I have family in Phoenix and I first went there in 1972,” Sukenik said. “Back then it was a much smaller community centered around fewer Jewish institutions such as synagogues and schools. Today the growth in Phoenix and also in Scottsdale is most impressive. many people in the area who are very involved in the Jewish community, and the sense of excitement surrounding the community is palpable.

JCT’s International Program in English offers students who are not fluent in Hebrew a viable opportunity to live and study Torah in Israel while pursuing a prestigious university degree in computer science or business administration. The program’s comprehensive dual curriculum combines high-level academic studies, enriching Jewish studies, and hands-on professional training.

While in Phoenix, Sukenik held meetings at Yeshiva High School in Arizona and recorded two podcasts with Rabbi Dr. Shmuly Yanklowitz, president and dean of Valley Beit Midrash.

Regarding the value proposition that JCT can offer international students, Sukenik said, “We provide the opportunity, especially for students who have participated in gap year programs, to stay in Jerusalem and obtain a full university degree. in English. The sensitive religious environment in which this degree is earned, and the fact that the degree is certified by the Israel Council for Higher Education and is respected by employers in Israel and abroad, are major assets.

For more information, visit jct.ac.il/international.

JFL student loan application deadline is approaching

Jewish Free Loan is proud to offer its semester interest-free student loan program to incoming and current undergraduate, graduate, and technical/vocational school students. To receive funding for the upcoming fall semester, please visit our website (jewishfreeloan.org/apply-now) and submit your student loan application by May 15, 2022. After the deadline, applications will only be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. basis for fall funding, however, students can also begin applying for funding for the spring semester.

To apply, applicants must be 18 years old, reside in Arizona, and be a member of the Jewish community. If you are entering an education program and you are not yet 18, a parent or guardian can apply on your behalf. For a full list of eligibility requirements and to learn more about this interest-free loan program, visit jewishfreeloan.org/student-loans. jn

]]>
McKinney executives balance growth with community – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/mckinney-executives-balance-growth-with-community-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ Tue, 03 May 2022 02:56:11 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/mckinney-executives-balance-growth-with-community-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ With an influx of new homes, new businesses, and new public spaces, North Texas has been experiencing explosive growth for years. In towns like McKinney, this growth can come with serious neighborhood issues, especially as new growth moves to older and often neglected neighborhoods. “When I came to McKinney, the population was 14,000,” said longtime […]]]>

With an influx of new homes, new businesses, and new public spaces, North Texas has been experiencing explosive growth for years.

In towns like McKinney, this growth can come with serious neighborhood issues, especially as new growth moves to older and often neglected neighborhoods.

“When I came to McKinney, the population was 14,000,” said longtime resident Thomas Johnson.

Johnson says he’s seen a lot of change at McKinney over the past five decades.

“It seems like every year it starts to grow and get bigger and bigger,” he said.

For years, Johnson said it seemed like most of that growth was on the west side of town. Now he watches crews build the new Tupps Brewery from his front porch. Soon, just around the corner from his home, there will be a new town hall and mixed-use developments.


NBC News 5

“Council chose the site here specifically to help reinvigorate and energize some of the vacant commercial and industrial space,” said Kim Flom, Deputy City Manager for the City of McKinney.

“When you look at some of the infrastructure and a lot of the reinvestment that’s happened on the west side…there’s been a lot of investment and energy that’s happened slowly, more organically here on the east side,” said Flom said. .

Flom says the city has already spent millions renovating parks in East McKinney, including more than $6 million for the expansion and renovation of the Old Settler Recreation Center. She says many of these projects have been in development for years. She also says leaders are asking for funding to repair roads in the area.

Flom says change is exciting, but for some it can feel threatening.

“Whenever a new development enters an area where there used to be affordable homes, it sometimes leads to higher property values ​​and more investment. This can be a challenge for people who have lived there for a long time. It’s tough. It’s really tough and there are no guarantees,” Flom said.

Flom says McKinney is trying to prevent the move and has created a community liaison committee to find out what longtime residents need to stay.

“We prayed for expansion,” said Deborah Bradford, community liaison officer and associate pastor of New Jerusalem Baptist Church. “The poorest ZIP code in town.”

From the pulpit of her church and in her role as a community bridge builder, Bradford shares the city’s plans for the future and gathers community feedback before passing it on to city leaders.

“The things that we see in West McKinney, we want to see some of those things in East McKinney as well. You know, we want to see improved roads. And we want to see businesses grow here, and banks. And we like the restaurants. We love sidewalks,” Bradford said.

She believes these things are on their way and families have a lot to gain from being involved in the process. Bradford says the church keeps a table on display in front of the pews from a recent sermon as a reminder to the congregation.

“An illustration that there is room at the table for everyone,” she said.

Bradford added that she feels people feel part of this growth and momentum.

“You can smell the hope,” she said.

The city hopes residents will share critical information that leaders will use to develop trip prevention strategies by completing an online survey.

It asks several questions about residents’ living conditions, including whether people rent or own their homes. If they own their home, if they need major repairs, and overall what would help them. He also asks if families get more options for transportation, utilities, rent or down payment assistance.

“Rising property taxes are a big concern. People want to stay in their homes, even when they see their property taxes go up,” Flom said.

Johnson says some people have already started selling and leaving. He pointed to the slab where his former neighbor’s house once stood. He says potential buyers have also knocked on his door, but so far no one has offered what he believes is enough money to enable him to move out and build or find another home.

For now, Johnson says he’s happy to have a front row seat to watch his community flourish.

“Having them build things and make them better for people, I think that’s great,” Johnson said.

The city is still collecting survey responses and offering respondents a chance to win $100 gift cards. Learn more here.

Flom says they are also moving forward with other anti-displacement plans. She says council has given approval for leaders to work towards building a community land trust to help maintain and build affordable housing. Learn more about the city’s redevelopment and preservation plans here.

]]>
Israelis stand in silence to remember the Holocaust – Community https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/israelis-stand-in-silence-to-remember-the-holocaust-community/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 08:03:45 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/israelis-stand-in-silence-to-remember-the-holocaust-community/ Press (AFP) Jerusalem, undefined ● Sat 30 April 2022 2022-04-30 21:25 1 53ea05b5fe2e13733519dbf4e3027089 2 Community Israel, Holocaust, ritual, Jews, World-War-II, commemoration Free Israel paused Thursday, halting the morning commotion for two minutes as sirens sounded to honor the millions murdered in the Holocaust. In an annual ritual at 10 a.m. (0700 GMT), pedestrians froze in […]]]>

Press (AFP)

Jerusalem, undefined ●
Sat 30 April 2022

2022-04-30
21:25
1
53ea05b5fe2e13733519dbf4e3027089
2
Community
Israel, Holocaust, ritual, Jews, World-War-II, commemoration
Free

Israel paused Thursday, halting the morning commotion for two minutes as sirens sounded to honor the millions murdered in the Holocaust.

In an annual ritual at 10 a.m. (0700 GMT), pedestrians froze in place. Drivers stopped and stood silently beside their vehicles, honoring the six million Jews killed by the Nazis during World War II.

At the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem, Prime Minister Naftali Bennett said Wednesday that the Holocaust is “the ultimate and absolute expression of thousands of years of anti-Semitism.”

Bennett also rejected any attempt to draw parallels between the Nazi genocide and current conflicts.

“I take the trouble to say this because over the years there is more and more discourse in the world that compares other difficult events to the Holocaust. But no. Even the most difficult wars today are not the Holocaust and are not comparable to the Holocaust,” he said.

In an address to Israeli lawmakers last month, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, who is Jewish, compared Russian aggression in his country to the Holocaust, drawing immediate criticism from some officials in Israel.

About 161,000 Holocaust survivors live in Israel, according to official figures.

German parliament speaker Baerbel Bas said during a visit to Yad Vashem on Wednesday that “a special obligation arises from Germany’s historic culpability.”

“Israel’s security and the fight against all forms of anti-Semitism are part of our national identity. We will not forget that,” she said.


]]>