Jerusalem development – Sustainable Jerusalem http://sustainable-jerusalem.org/ Thu, 19 May 2022 13:24:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-12.png Jerusalem development – Sustainable Jerusalem http://sustainable-jerusalem.org/ 32 32 Russia does not plan to block YouTube, says Minister of Digital Development https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/russia-does-not-plan-to-block-youtube-says-minister-of-digital-development/ Tue, 17 May 2022 11:25:39 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/russia-does-not-plan-to-block-youtube-says-minister-of-digital-development/ Fake news or free speech: Top CEO conference panel examines the dangers of the age of digital media DUBAI: Fake news, a term popularized by former US President Donald Trump to chastise sections of the media, is seen by many in civil society and the business community as one of the most harmful phenomena in […]]]>

Fake news or free speech: Top CEO conference panel examines the dangers of the age of digital media

DUBAI: Fake news, a term popularized by former US President Donald Trump to chastise sections of the media, is seen by many in civil society and the business community as one of the most harmful phenomena in the world. digital age.

There are several recent examples of misinformation, or even deliberate misinformation, being posted online and then amplified through social media, with real-world consequences ranging from stoking ethnic tensions to undermining public health initiatives.

Take, for example, the case of Edgar Welch, a 28-year-old father of two from Salisbury, North Carolina, who in December 2016 read an article online about an alleged elite pedophile ring operating at a pizzeria in Washington DC.

“Pizzagate”, as it was called, was a far-right conspiracy theory, which sought to link several senior Democratic Party officials to an alleged human trafficking and pedophilia ring linked to a restaurant named Comet Ping Pong.

After reading the article, Welch took a gun and drove the full six hours from his home to Washington D.C. where he opened fire on the restaurant. No one was injured in the attack, and the allegations have since been completely refuted.

Compare this example with footage released on May 13 of Israeli security forces attacking Palestinian pallbearers carrying the coffin of veteran Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh, who was shot two days earlier.

Thanks to a video captured by witnesses on their smartphones and shared on social media, the whole world could instantly bear witness to this shocking incident, prompting world leaders to condemn the funeral assault.

During a panel discussion at the Top CEO Conference in Dubai on May 17, these two incidents were brought up as examples of the enormous power of social media as a means, on the one hand, of spreading misinformation. and, on the other hand, to expose the truth.

It is because of the positive characteristics of social media as a weapon of truth that the media and civil society are wary of onerous government regulation of these platforms, which could undermine freedom of expression.

“No one is against freedom, but we should also be against chaos,” Arab News editor Faisal J. Abbas said on Tuesday.

“We’re talking billions of people, billions of posts, it’s physically impossible to monitor everything and by the time they get there the damage would most likely have been done.

“If you remember back in 2016, the fake story that was spreading on Facebook and other platforms about the pizzeria that had a child abuse ring, and someone took a gun and went to shoot on the spot.

“The story has had more views than rebuttals. The crazier the news, the more content it creates, the more traction websites like Facebook gain,” Abbas said.

“There is no end to fake news, but we must continue to fight it.”

Indeed, the digital transformation, which has revolutionized information sharing in just a few short years, has left regulators and businesses struggling to deal with some of its most damaging manifestations.

Hussein Freijeh, chief executive of Snap Inc. MENA, who also participated in Tuesday’s panel, said governments’ efforts to regulate online platforms should not “remove responsibility from tech platforms” to fight fake news. .

“When we talk about regulation, there is a component of thoughtful regulation with the government, and we want to engage with that and help the government figure out what that means,” Freijeh told Arab News on the sidelines of Tuesday’s forum.

“Then there’s self-regulation, or platform regulation. And that’s our responsibility and how we deal with product design, and how do we put the policy in place to control that.

“And then (there is) the self-responsibility of the (content) creators and the community, and that’s an educational process. It takes a lot of technology to enable self-regulation, and that’s a process in which we must engage.

Although fake news was by no means created by social media, the speed and accessibility of these networks means that harmful and malicious behavior now has greater reach than ever before.

“Social media has given people freedom,” Khaled Janahi, president of Vision 3, told the panel on Tuesday. But, he warned, people need to use it correctly.

In separate comments to Arab News, Thomas Hughes, executive director of Meta’s oversight board, said social media companies have a role to play in fighting fake news.

“Content moderation policies should be designed to reflect the kinds of standards we want to set globally,” he said.

“As the (supervisory) board cannot hear all the appeals, when we select cases, we think about the type of precedent our decision could set, and we prioritize cases that have the potential to affect many users in the world, are of critical importance to public discourse or raise important questions about Meta policies.

He added that Meta – formerly known as Facebook – has already issued more than 100 recommendations and is committed to implementing the majority of them.

But conflicts like those raging in Ukraine and Ethiopia, according to Hughes, fuel the fire of fake news.

Conflict and instability “unfortunately go hand in hand with an increase in misinformation and disinformation – although this problem is very global”, he told Arab News.

Journalists can play a key role in combating fake news, according to Hughes, which is why many Meta board members have worked in mainstream media in the past.

“They are passionate about these issues and ensuring that more is done to protect journalists and freedom of expression, while also working to protect people from harm.”

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Sustainable Development Goals in jeopardy due to cuts in foreign aid https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/sustainable-development-goals-in-jeopardy-due-to-cuts-in-foreign-aid/ Sun, 15 May 2022 19:40:21 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/sustainable-development-goals-in-jeopardy-due-to-cuts-in-foreign-aid/ The World Bank’s Board of Directors today approved the US$250 million COVID-19 Pandemic Learning Loss Recovery Project in Brazil. The program will support Brazil’s strategy to promote the resumption of learning and address school dropout rates related to the emergency health crisis, implementing innovative programs and systems to strengthen the management of learning. education in […]]]>

The World Bank’s Board of Directors today approved the US$250 million COVID-19 Pandemic Learning Loss Recovery Project in Brazil. The program will support Brazil’s strategy to promote the resumption of learning and address school dropout rates related to the emergency health crisis, implementing innovative programs and systems to strengthen the management of learning. education in primary and secondary schools in the north and northeast of the country.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has inflicted unprecedented challenges on global education. A systematic recovery strategy will enable Brazil not only to reverse pandemic-related learning losses, but also to promote strong and lasting improvement in education,” says the Ministry of Education Victor Godoy Veiga.

Brazil has experienced one of the longest school closures in the region due to the pandemic. According to the Brazilian Ministry of Education, public schools remained closed for an average of 287.4 days (about 9.5 months) while private schools closed for 247.7 days (about 8 months), which represents a public-private difference of 40 days. The North and Northeast regions recorded an even longer period of school closure, with Bahia State recording the longest school closure (366.4 days on average), followed by Roraima (349, 4 days), Rio Grande do Norte (336.5 days), Acre (332.7 days) and Amapá (332.4 days).

Despite efforts to promote online courses, barriers to connectivity, both in schools and in students’ homes, have hindered learning, especially in northern and northeastern regions of Brazil. According to the 2020 school census, only 60% of public schools in Brazil have internet. This situation is even worse in the north and northeast of Brazil, where Internet connectivity is only available in 48.5% of public schools (broadband in only 39%).

The proposed operation aims to bridge regional gaps by supporting innovative online and face-to-face programs. Some key initiatives include: (i) the establishment of National and State School Dropout Observatories (OSD); (ii) an Early Warning System (EWS), to help identify students at high risk of dropping out; Personalized tutoring for teachers and social-emotional initiative (SIS), to rebuild the socio-emotional skills of students and encourage them to learn effectively.

Once back at school, the challenge is to make the students (re)learn effectively. In this aspect, the program has two lines of action: face-to-face approaches by offering a personalized tutoring program (APA) to small groups of students with similar learning gaps; and structured group discussions in the SIS to mitigate the impacts of the pandemic on students’ social-emotional skills. The second line of action focuses on hybrid strategies and education systems to recover learning losses, providing internet connectivity to schools, internet access for vulnerable students under law 14,172 and to bring in the interior municipalities the laboratories of creativity and innovation, facilities in which teachers and principals will be trained to use technology in the classroom and to master the fundamental teaching skills necessary to help students recover from the losses of ‘learning.

The project will also offer support to two innovative education systems: the Education Solutions Ecosystem, which aims to offer a range of educational tools to public schools, including adaptive learning platforms; and the Integrated Education Management Platform, which focuses on integrating the education management system of the Ministry of Education. By strengthening blended learning models, training teachers in the use of technology, and strengthening education systems, the project plans to build resilience to future pandemics and natural disasters that could disrupt learning and teaching. .

“The world faces a silent education crisis. Urgent action is needed. By supporting this comprehensive and innovative learning recovery program, the World Bank is confident that Brazil will become a model for countries in the region on how to address the learning crisis,” says World Bank Country Director Paloma Anós Casero.

Results supported by the program include:

  • Creation of National and Departmental School Dropout Observatories (OSD).
  • Implementation of an Early Warning System (SAP).
  • Implementation of an education and family program.
  • Implementation of a Personalized Tutoring Program (APA).
  • Implementation of the Socio-Emotional Initiative (SIS).

This International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) loan to the Ministry of Education is guaranteed by the Federative Republic of Brazil and has a final maturity of 34.5 years, with a grace period of 5 years.

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The Holy Spirit, the Samaritan Woman, and Doctrinal Development https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/the-holy-spirit-the-samaritan-woman-and-doctrinal-development/ Sun, 15 May 2022 07:51:29 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/the-holy-spirit-the-samaritan-woman-and-doctrinal-development/ Schuppi: Saint Photina and Christ / Wikimedia Commons The grace of God is for everyone; everyone is called to drink from the spiritual well and quench their thirst. Christ wants to share the Holy Spirit, and all the gifts of the Spirit, with everyone; Jesus is the anointed; we can and must be united with […]]]>

Schuppi: Saint Photina and Christ / Wikimedia Commons

The grace of God is for everyone; everyone is called to drink from the spiritual well and quench their thirst. Christ wants to share the Holy Spirit, and all the gifts of the Spirit, with everyone; Jesus is the anointed; we can and must be united with him, and through that unity also become anointed. Man, woman, Jew, Gentile, sinner, budding saint, all can come to Christ and have their spiritual thirst quenched. All are called; we should not try to put barriers between the Holy Spirit and those who need the gifts of the Spirit, because in doing so, we are likely to be the ones cut off as the Spirit. For, verily, the Spirit blows where it wills, and we will not stop it.

What we need to do is recognize and accept the work of the Spirit where it is. We must strangle the Spirit, that is, we must not act against God’s work in the world. The Holy Spirit will not be compelled. Peter, as the leader of the apostles, was always learning from God, always finding that his beliefs and understandings were challenged and transcended by what God was doing in and through him. As he learned, Peter developed his understanding, and in doing so he developed the church’s understanding of the implications of what Christ taught them. Peter began the long process of doctrinal development, a development that continues to this day, a development that should bring changes to the church. A good example of this can be found in how he learned that God called Gentiles, not just Jews, to his church:

When I started to speak, the Holy Spirit descended on them as on us at the beginning. And I remembered the word of the Lord, how he said, ‘John baptized with water, but you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit.’ So if God gave them the same gift He gave us when we believed on the Lord Jesus Christ, who was I to resist God? When they heard this, they were silenced. And they glorify God, saying, “Then to the Gentiles also God granted repentance for life” (Acts 11:15-18 RSV).

Peter came to understand a truth that had its foundation in the ministry of Jesus. but that it took him time to understand and accept. The development of Christian doctrine is always like this. Once such a development occurs, it becomes clear, although it can and will criticize elements once believed, it is based on tradition and is in continuity with it, for its basis is contained in the tradition (even if he shows himself changing the way tradition is interpreted and understood). Indeed, after such a development, these elements will often be much more apparent than they were before, especially since, on many occasions, these elements were often just as confusing and therefore often not as engaged. than they should have been until development happened. This is probably what happened with Peter and the rest of the apostles when they first reflected on Jesus’ encounter with Saint Photina, the Samaritan woman at Jacob’s well:

A woman from Samaria came to draw water. Jesus said to him, “Give me a drink. For his disciples had gone to the city to buy food. The Samaritan woman said to him: “How is it that you, Jew, ask me for a drink, I who am a Samaritan? Because the Jews have no connection with the Samaritans. Jesus answered him: “If you knew the gift of God and who it is that says to you, ‘Give me a drink,’ you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.” The woman said to him, “Lord, you have nothing to draw from, and the well is deep; where do you find this living water? Art thou greater than our father Jacob, who gave us the well and drank from it himself, and his sons, and his cattle? Jesus said to him, “Everyone who drinks of this water will be thirsty again, but whoever drinks of the water that I will give him will never be thirsty again; the water that I will give him will become in him a spring of water welling up to eternal life” (Jn 4, 7-14 RSV).

Jesus gave the Samaritan woman the gift of the Holy Spirit, and she was just as confused as everyone else as to why Jesus was talking to her the way he did. Through her discussion with him, she realized that he was the messiah. He showed how well he knew her, and yet, despite knowing everything he knew about her, knowing intimate details that no one else should have known, he still cared about her, by Indeed, he loved her, and was ready to give her what she craved inside. And he was told that the Messianic Age would bring about a transformation in the world, so that people from all walks of life, from different cultures and walks of life, men and women, would find themselves united, worshiping God together in spirit and in truth:

Jesus said to her: “Woman, believe me, the hour is coming when it is neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem that you will worship the Father. You adore what you do not know; we worship what we know, for salvation comes from the Jews. But the hour is coming, and it has already come, when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and in truth, for that is how the Father seeks to worship him. God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth” (John 4:21-24 RSV).

Jesus, while affirming the special place of the Jews in salvation history, provided the foundation by which Peter and the other apostles could understand how and why, in light of Jesus’ resurrection from the dead, the Spirit would be offered to all, not just Jews. The special place the Jews had in the history of salvation would not be denied, for, as Jesus said, salvation came from the Jews, but the understanding of the significance of the Jews and their covenant relationship has exchange. It was not to be diminished, but increased. The gifts given to the Jews were not meant to be theirs alone, but something that would be shared with all who came together to worship God in spirit and in truth. Peter would therefore have what he needed to understand the action of the Spirit in and with the Gentiles through Jesus’ encounter with the Samaritan woman, although of course at the time he and the other disciples did not. did not see that way, in fact, they only wondered what Jesus was doing when they saw him with Photina (cf. Jn 4:27). So it is with doctrinal development; it is based on a truth which has been given and which is already there, but which was not properly understood until later. And then when such changes occur, we find that a new difficulty arises, because then what we learn has to be put into action, which is not easy because old habits are hard to break.

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Baswedan visit to Europe aims to explore cooperation on MRT development https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/baswedan-visit-to-europe-aims-to-explore-cooperation-on-mrt-development/ Tue, 10 May 2022 08:23:47 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/baswedan-visit-to-europe-aims-to-explore-cooperation-on-mrt-development/ (Governor Baswedan) has received invitations (from various communities), so his visit to Europe is also aimed at responding to these invitations Jakarta (ANTARA) – Jakarta Governor Anie Baswedan has planned to visit Germany, France and the United Kingdom to explore cooperation opportunities in the development of Jakarta Mass Rapid Transit (MRT), according to a provincial […]]]>

(Governor Baswedan) has received invitations (from various communities), so his visit to Europe is also aimed at responding to these invitations

Jakarta (ANTARA) – Jakarta Governor Anie Baswedan has planned to visit Germany, France and the United Kingdom to explore cooperation opportunities in the development of Jakarta Mass Rapid Transit (MRT), according to a provincial official. .

“We will first follow up cooperation on (the province’s) transportation development, including to finance the development of Jakarta MRT and other modes of transportation (during the working visit),” Jakarta Deputy Governor Ahmad Riza Patria said on Tuesday.

The Deputy Governor noted that Baswedan will depart for Europe on Tuesday evening and is expected to travel to London, Berlin and Paris during his eight-day working visit.

Besides exploring opportunities for cooperation on the development of Jakarta MRT, his visit to Europe also aims to respond to invitations from transport and mobility communities and discuss cooperation between sister cities and smart cities with city ​​officials, he noted.

“(Governor Baswedan) has received invitations (from various communities), so his visit to Europe is also aimed at fulfilling those invitations,” Patria remarked.

Related News: 10,000 homecomers leave Gambir station on Friday: KAI

He noted that Jakarta’s sister cities included Arkansas, Bangkok, Beijing, Berlin, Budapest, Casablanca, Hanoi, Islamabad, Jeddah, Jerusalem, Kyiv, Los Angeles, Moscow, Rotterdam, Paris, Pyongyang, Seoul, and Tokyo.

Previously, Governor Baswedan had met with several foreign officials, including British Secretary of State for International Trade Anne-Marie Trevelyan, during his visit last February.

Related News: 150,000 travelers expected at Soeta Airport during peak Eid return

The two officials discussed cooperation between Indonesia and the UK in various climate response programs to support Jakarta’s efforts to achieve its zero emissions target by 2050.

Apart from deliberate climate response programs, Baswedan and Trevelyan had discussed cooperation for the expansion of Jakarta’s MRT route and the electrification of public transport in the province.

“Jakarta welcomes the initiative to involve the UK in developing the Jakarta MRT east-west route. God willing, all efforts would be carried out smoothly,” the governor noted on Wednesday, February 23.

Related News: Jakarta speeds up response measures to manage acute hepatitis

Related News: One-Way and Contra-Way Systems Implemented on Jakarta-Cikampek Toll Road

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Egypt to proceed with comprehensive development of railway network https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/egypt-to-proceed-with-comprehensive-development-of-railway-network/ Sun, 08 May 2022 11:48:15 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/egypt-to-proceed-with-comprehensive-development-of-railway-network/ The Egyptian government is developing its rail network to provide distinguished services to passengers on Cairo’s trains and metro, said Transport Minister Kamel al-Wazir. Wazir said President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi ordered to expand and complete the railway network and to develop and rehabilitate Helwan and Shubra el-Kheima stations. Wazir added that political leaders have also […]]]>

The Egyptian government is developing its rail network to provide distinguished services to passengers on Cairo’s trains and metro, said Transport Minister Kamel al-Wazir.

Wazir said President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi ordered to expand and complete the railway network and to develop and rehabilitate Helwan and Shubra el-Kheima stations.

Wazir added that political leaders have also ordered a giant transport network of environment-friendly means of electric traction, such as the three-line monorail network and the monorail and light rail projects. , which constitute a major qualitative leap in the means of transport of the country.

According to the government, the railway development project is based on several elements, including mobile units (cars and tractors) and rails (rails, stations and level crossings).

In addition to this, it aims to develop the traffic light system to increase the safety and security factors and provide the project sites with all modern equipment, as well as train and educate the workers.

Last year, Egypt experienced several train accidents that left dozens dead and injured.

Wazir inspected Cairo’s main Ramses railway station on Saturday and was briefed on the trial operation of its electronic gates.

He was also informed about the new reservation system and its integration with the old reservation system and electronic portals.

According to the ministry statement, electronic gates have been installed at the stations of Ramses, Giza, Sidi Gaber, Misr in Alexandria and Damanhour to regulate the entry and exit of passengers.

Wazir said the first metro line will be developed to improve train arrival times and the service provided to passengers, develop traffic, communication and central control systems, as well as mobile units by purchasing 55 new trains air-conditioned.


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Secretary General, Ukraine, Forum on Financing for Development and other topics – Daily Press Briefing https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/secretary-general-ukraine-forum-on-financing-for-development-and-other-topics-daily-press-briefing/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/secretary-general-ukraine-forum-on-financing-for-development-and-other-topics-daily-press-briefing/ The Secretary-General is traveling to Moscow today, after earlier meeting with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan in Ankara. Tomorrow in Moscow, the Secretary General will have a working meeting and lunch with Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and will be received by President Vladimir Putin. Turning to Ukraine, UN Crisis Coordinator Amin Awad yesterday called for […]]]>

The Secretary-General is traveling to Moscow today, after earlier meeting with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan in Ankara. Tomorrow in Moscow, the Secretary General will have a working meeting and lunch with Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and will be received by President Vladimir Putin. Turning to Ukraine, UN Crisis Coordinator Amin Awad yesterday called for an immediate halt to fighting in Mariupol to allow civilians trapped in the besieged city to evacuate safely.
This morning, Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed spoke on behalf of the Secretary-General at the opening of the Financing for Development Forum. She said the global economy is under severe pressure and the Sustainable Development Goals need an urgent rescue. We issued a statement on Sudan this morning, in which the Secretary-General deplored the killings of civilians in the locality of Kreinik, West Darfur, as well as the attacks on health facilities on 24 April. Our humanitarian colleagues point out that the recent outbreak of clashes is aggravating the dire humanitarian situation in Kreinik, where more than half of the population – some 265,700 people – was already considered to be in need of humanitarian assistance at the start of this year.
The United Nations Mission in South Sudan today strongly condemned the widespread sexual violence, as well as killings, including beheadings, civilians being burned to death and attacks on aid workers in Leer County.
Tor Wennesland, the UN Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process, briefed the Security Council this morning. He said that in Jerusalem, the situation remains relatively calm despite the inflammatory rhetoric and violent clashes between Palestinians and the Israeli Security Forces (ISF) that have taken place at the holy sites. Last night, the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon, UNIFIL, detected a rocket launched from southern Lebanon towards Israel. The Israel Defense Forces returned dozens of shells in Lebanon.
The United Nations Mission in Mali strongly condemned yesterday’s attacks against the Malian Armed Forces in Sévaré, Niono and Bapho. Several soldiers were killed during these attacks. At the request of the Malian armed forces, the UN Mission immediately deployed a rapid reaction force in Sévaré.
In a statement issued over the weekend, the Secretary-General hailed the efforts of the President of Kenya, Uhuru Kenyatta, and other East African leaders to promote peace, stability and development in the Democratic Republic of Congo and the greater East African region.
Also, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the World Health Organization says the country has declared an Ebola outbreak after a case was confirmed in Mbandaka, a town in the northwest of Equateur province. . This is the third outbreak in the province since 2018.
We issued a statement this weekend to express the Secretary-General’s sadness at the death of Mwai Kibaki, former President of the Republic of Kenya.
Our United Nations team in Brazil, led by Resident Coordinator Silvia Rucks, continues to support authorities in responding to the multiple impacts of the pandemic, with a focus on promoting sustainable development.
Today’s guest will be the President of the Economic and Social Council, Collen Vixen Kelapile. He will join us in this room to present the Forum on Financing for Development and the High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development. At 1:15 p.m., there will be a hybrid briefing here on the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Peoples. Speakers will be Dario José Mejia Montalvo, president-elect of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and head of the National Indigenous Organization of Colombia; and Rose Anne Archibald, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations. Tomorrow my guest will be Mami Mizutori, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Disaster Risk Reduction and Head of the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction. She will present on the UN 2022 Global Risk Assessment for Disaster Risk Reduction. At 1:30 p.m. there will be a hybrid press briefing on the upcoming 55th session of the United Nations Commission on Population and Development. Speakers will include Ambassador Enrique A. Manalo, Permanent Representative of the Philippines to the United Nations and Chair of the fifty-fifth session of the Commission on Population and Development.

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Study: East Jerusalem faces gaps in child development monitoring https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/study-east-jerusalem-faces-gaps-in-child-development-monitoring/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 13:43:14 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/study-east-jerusalem-faces-gaps-in-child-development-monitoring/ Only three percent of children in East Jerusalem are diagnosed with developmental disabilities New research has revealed that Palestinian children in East Jerusalem face significant gaps in the diagnosis of developmental issues compared to the rest of Israel. Sociologists at the Jerusalem Institute for Policy Research have identified three barriers that hinder the timely identification […]]]>

Only three percent of children in East Jerusalem are diagnosed with developmental disabilities

New research has revealed that Palestinian children in East Jerusalem face significant gaps in the diagnosis of developmental issues compared to the rest of Israel.

Sociologists at the Jerusalem Institute for Policy Research have identified three barriers that hinder the timely identification and diagnosis of developmental disabilities:

– Lack of staff in child health centers

– Negligence on the part of caregivers

– Logistical issues, including language barriers and transportation issues

According to Ha’aretzthese problems also hinder assistance to diagnosed children.

However, only 3% of children in East Jerusalem are diagnosed, compared to 10-15% in Israel as a whole.

“Even with the best of intentions…carers never meet to consult and find children who need help,” said sociologist Dganit Levi.

Most of the diagnostic and treatment services run by the HMO for Child Development are located in predominantly Jewish West Jerusalem, which adds to the difficulties, Ha’aretz reported.

“For a woman from East Jerusalem, it is not so easy to go to [west Jerusalem]said Dr. Sarit Bensimhon-Peleg, head of research at the Institute.

“Certainly not in times of [Arab-Jewish] tension and certainly if she does not speak Hebrew, and when there is fear and shame associated with the process.

The study further pointed out that most medical services in East Jerusalem often depend on doctors who are not licensed in Israel or have sufficient qualifications.

Levi and Bensimhon-Peleg suggested that all HMOs should work together to establish a single child development center in East Jerusalem, Ha’aretz reported.

An alternative, they mentioned, could be to organize intensive “diagnosis days” in the Palestinian area with teams from West Jerusalem.

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Crucifixion and Development | Journalist https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/crucifixion-and-development-journalist/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 00:45:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/crucifixion-and-development-journalist/ We are in Holy Week, the holiest time for many Christian denominations. We are thinking right now of the suffering, death and resurrection of Jesus which form the foundation of the Christian faith. If the resurrection has not taken place, going to church is a waste of time. To be convinced of this is more […]]]>

We are in Holy Week, the holiest time for many Christian denominations. We are thinking right now of the suffering, death and resurrection of Jesus which form the foundation of the Christian faith.

If the resurrection has not taken place, going to church is a waste of time. To be convinced of this is more a matter of faith than of putting together the historical pieces.

Why did Jesus die? To pay for the sins of mankind, to redeem us from the devil, his Father predestined him, these are some of the many answers that have been given over the centuries. Another, more modern response is to ensure integral human development, whatever the cost.

The key to unraveling this developmental claim is the metaphor Jesus chose to describe his dream – basileia – sometimes translated as “kingdom” or more recently “reign of God” or “government of God”, both of which I find unappealing, because they are not. t convey energy or excitement. You can piss people off on a kingdom, not on a reign. Try saying, “For thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory.” It falls flat.

Jesus himself does not deny being king and says very explicitly that his kingdom is not of this kind (Jn 18:36). It’s quite different from what we hear most of the time. We hear of “church”, but it is mentioned only three times by Jesus, all in the Gospel of Matthew. More often, Jesus speaks of the kingdom – a broader term that eludes definition but not description.

He always says: “the kingdom of God is like…” In Jn 18:37, he links the kingdom to the truth. Speak truth to power – people always get killed for that one. Holy Week begins with a politically subversive act – a peasant, apocalyptic preacher entering Jerusalem on a donkey. This customary motif is normally associated with a king entering the city after victory.

Everything is turned upside down: a peasant, not a king; a battle yet to be won, not a victory; a donkey, not a horse; the power of truth, not worldly power. Jesus had died long before Calvary and he alone knew the most. It is the utter loneliness of men and women who know they are going to die because of the double standards they are about to expose. I am thinking in particular of investigative journalists and human rights defenders, the unsung saints.

While all the different theories of salvation have merit, including Jesus’ death for love for us, the fact that he died in the service of integral human development puts a different spin on things. He moves from the church into the world of politics, big business, economics, communications, culture, etc., because that’s where the gospel leads.

If love is real, it dares to face the truth and because of that it becomes subversive as it did in South Africa, in the civil rights movement in America, in the liberation theology of Latin America and in the Black Power movement of 1970 here. My intention is not to make the mistake that many scholars make, of making Jesus some kind of political hero, military subversive, or social reformer.

At the heart of his struggle was not a humanism, but a transcendental humanism – he was passionate about what God wanted his world to look like. Religion meant the world to him because the best in his religion envisioned “a new heaven and a new earth” for mankind.

In many ways, Trinidad and Tobago is a cruel society – high levels of domestic violence; the failure to educate large masses of young men, who in turn turn hopelessly to crime, only to be brutalized in turn by the police who must be seen as tough on crime; blatant prejudices based on race and social class; a justice system that does not and cannot work for those who need it most, as witnesses are systematically and heartlessly eliminated; the veneer of religious respectability; not to mention billions of oil and gas revenues wasted through mismanagement, excessive subsidies and lack of investment.

The world and the Church would be a much better place if there were more David Abdulah in it, because unlike most, he has, dare I say, a Christian social conscience. It is no secret that the corridors of power in this country are filled with Christians, especially Catholics and Anglicans.

What does that tell us this week? Are we really working hard enough, especially the Christian professional elite, to make this country look like it should be: a sign of the Kingdom among us?

We can start with respect and justice. We can’t seem to hold a human conversation anymore. Everyone is so angry, so emotionally unstable. And for all this talk about love, which I’m sick of, I’ll settle for Cornel West: “Justice is what love looks like in public.”

I hope this Holy Week we remember not only our personal sins, but also our systemic sins, for which this first century Palestinian preacher was crucified.

—Father Martin Sirju is Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Port of Spain.

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Who’s Who: Ghadeer Attallah, Head of Cultural Development at the Diriyah Gate Development Authority https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/whos-who-ghadeer-attallah-head-of-cultural-development-at-the-diriyah-gate-development-authority/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 20:36:18 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/whos-who-ghadeer-attallah-head-of-cultural-development-at-the-diriyah-gate-development-authority/ How solar energy is contributing to the energy transition in Saudi Arabia and other Arab Gulf States DUBAI: The Gulf States are accelerating the transition to renewable energy by launching ambitious infrastructure projects aimed at reducing their dependence on oil and gas to meet domestic energy needs. Some of these projects will allow Saudi Arabia […]]]>

How solar energy is contributing to the energy transition in Saudi Arabia and other Arab Gulf States

DUBAI: The Gulf States are accelerating the transition to renewable energy by launching ambitious infrastructure projects aimed at reducing their dependence on oil and gas to meet domestic energy needs.

Some of these projects will allow Saudi Arabia to increase its total solar power capacity by nearly 40 gigawatts by 2025 from the current 455 megawatts. Specific development plans in the Kingdom include the NEOM smart city, which will include a $5 billion hydrogen plant, and the Red Sea project, which will have the capacity to generate 400MW of solar power and host the largest off-grid energy in the world. storage project to date.

“Saudi Arabia is making notable progress in its clean energy development and emission reduction projects,” Denisa Fainis, secretary general of the Middle East Solar Industry Association, told Arab News.

“Climate action will go hand in hand with continued strong demand for fossil fuels. As the world’s largest oil exporter, more than half of Saudi Arabia’s revenue comes from its fossil fuel sector. »

Solar panels at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology. (Reuters/File photo)

The latest MESIA report, released in January, listed Saudi Arabia as one of the “booming markets for the renewable energy sector, bringing more investors and developers into huge projects than any other.” “. He said improvements in regulatory frameworks have helped the country position itself among a group of nations leading the clean energy revolution.

The Kingdom’s $500 billion NEOM megaproject will play a key role in efforts to diversify the Saudi economy while relying exclusively on clean energy resources. It is estimated that NEOM will need 20-40 GW of solar and wind capacity to meet its energy needs when it becomes operational in 2025.

Kingdom authorities are planning several other projects in areas such as the Red Sea, Medina, Qurayyat, Jeddah and Wadi Al-Dawasir to help achieve the national goal of net zero emissions by 2060.

Elsewhere in the region, the 800 MW Al-Kharsaah solar project in Qatar is expected to be operational by mid-2022. In the United Arab Emirates, the 5,000 MW Mohammed Bin Rashid Solar Park in Dubai and the Al-Dhafra Solar Project, which will have a capacity of 2,000 MW, will be commissioned in stages by 2030.

Authorities in Iraq, Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Morocco and Tunisia have launched similar projects in the development or tender phase.

Significantly, many countries in the region see the energy transition as an opportunity for economic growth and job creation, including the potential for local manufacturing of solar energy components.

Saudis work at a solar panel factory in Uyayna, north of Riyadh. (AFP/file photo)

The Gulf region obviously enjoys a geographical advantage in the solar energy sector, thanks to abundant sunshine and its proximity to Africa, Europe and other countries in the Middle East, which makes it positioned to become a long-term energy exporter.

“By harnessing photovoltaic energy from the largest source in the universe and providing access to electricity to areas that still depend on fossil fuels, we can reduce carbon emissions, reduce operating costs and maintenance of businesses and improving air quality, while continuing to develop in the will provide jobs for generations to come,” said Fainis.

In the five years since announcing their Vision 2030 economic reform program, Saudi authorities have moved quickly with plans to develop the renewable energy sector. The Kingdom has set a target to generate half of its electricity needs from renewable sources by 2030, or 60 GW from solar and other forms of clean energy.

Saudi Arabia also plans to increase sustainability through adopting a circular carbon economy approach, a massive tree-planting campaign, reducing carbon emissions by more than four percent of contributions global policies and measures to combat pollution and land degradation.

The country also plans to issue its first green bond early this year that respects environmental, social and governance concerns. These bonds will become one of the main funding channels for the future of the Kingdom.

As part of Vision 2030, the Ministry of Energy is constructing two renewable energy power plants, with a capacity of 600 MW, in the third industrial city of Jeddah and the industrial city of Rabigh. The projects are implemented through MODON, the Saudi Authority for Industrial Cities and Technological Zones.

The Gulf States are accelerating the transition to renewable energy by launching ambitious infrastructure projects aimed at reducing their dependence on oil and gas. (AFP/file photo)

Meanwhile, a Red Sea battery storage project will help ensure that the new resort destination taking shape along the Kingdom’s west coast is powered entirely by renewable energy, and the Kingdom also plans to establish 23 solar panel factories in 12 industrial cities. At the end of last year, the largest solar power plant in the region, with a production capacity of up to 1.2 GW, was inaugurated in Tabuk.

Saudi Arabia’s successes and ambitious plans are indicative of a broader trend. According to MESIA, solar capacity in the Middle East and North Africa region has the potential to reach up to 8,309 MW this year as the region adds more renewable energy projects to reach individual national goals and transition strategies.

“There is a massive expansion that can be anticipated over the next decade for the MENA region, (which is) particularly attractive for solar investment because the region has some of the highest solar irradiance levels in the world,” Fainis said.

In addition to production, she believes the Arab region could also take the lead in storage solutions, which is another untapped area.

Countries like Algeria, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, United Arab Emirates, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia are also rapidly adopting the use of new technologies in the energy sector. renewables, including artificial intelligence systems. According to MESIA, the Saudi smart grid market is expected to reach $3.6 billion by 2030. Indeed, NEOM is expected to be powered entirely by AI-controlled solutions that use 100% renewable energy.

“Globally, the MENA region has an ideal combination of large usable land areas for solar PV power plants and high solar irradiation levels to maximize power generation from solar energy,” MESIA said in its report. in January.

Solar and wind power aren’t the only renewables that are attracting a wave of investment. Green hydrogen is seen as an important emerging player in the energy mix as part of the process to achieve net zero targets set by regional governments, particularly in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

The capacity of the world’s largest solar PV power plant under a single contract, which will be located in Sudair Industrial City in northern Saudi Arabia, will be 1,500 MW. (Provided)

All of these projects will be essential to efforts to mitigate the effects of climate change in a region where the damage it is causing is tangible.

Mercedes Maroto-Valer, director of the Research Center for Carbon Solutions at Heriot-Watt University in Dubai and director of the UK Industrial Decarbonization Research and Innovation Centre, warned that the climate situation in the region is getting worse.

“Temperatures have also increased, with the highest regional temperature so far recorded in Mitribah in Kuwait at 54C,” she told Arab News.

However, with the development of new technologies and the ambitious national targets agreed at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow last November, there is still hope for a more sustainable future.

Fainis believes that the MENA region needs to develop a local supply chain for equipment and training programs for the local workforce, build capacity for technology transfer and continue to attract foreign investment.

“As the population grows, the demand for electricity will reach unprecedented heights,” she said. “Whether through energy auditors or regulators’ initiatives, countries will need to adapt to growing energy needs.”

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Letters to the editor for April 13, 2022: Other development views, more https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/letters-to-the-editor-for-april-13-2022-other-development-views-more/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 09:02:11 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/letters-to-the-editor-for-april-13-2022-other-development-views-more/ Protect existing neighborhoods Several of Mayor Lauren Poe’s ideas are obviously outrageous to anyone who has lived in Gainesville for the past 50 years and worked in housing construction. First, it didn’t matter whether a new subdivision had modest ranch-style homes or monstrous, expensive homes—over time, lots got smaller and smaller. It is the cost […]]]>

Protect existing neighborhoods

Several of Mayor Lauren Poe’s ideas are obviously outrageous to anyone who has lived in Gainesville for the past 50 years and worked in housing construction.

First, it didn’t matter whether a new subdivision had modest ranch-style homes or monstrous, expensive homes—over time, lots got smaller and smaller. It is the cost of land (it does not fall) that will prevent modest families from his well-meaning ideas. The solution: turn the Ironwood Golf Course and other city properties into free land for 800-square-foot homes.

Second, the mayor and city commission were elected to serve the current citizens of Gainesville, not someone who will come here in the future. From my arrival in Gainesville in the early 1970s until recently, the citizens’ mantra was to protect existing neighborhoods – and also to have no more two-story buildings, especially on east-west streets laid out by neighborhoods. Due to city and county traffic lane decisions made years ago, it is financially impossible to improve traffic corridors.

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