Jerusalem institute – Sustainable Jerusalem http://sustainable-jerusalem.org/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 02:57:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-12.png Jerusalem institute – Sustainable Jerusalem http://sustainable-jerusalem.org/ 32 32 Shamir Medical Center receives $ 8.8 million. expand the cancer institute https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/shamir-medical-center-receives-8-8-million-expand-the-cancer-institute/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 08:35:09 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/shamir-medical-center-receives-8-8-million-expand-the-cancer-institute/ Israel’s Shamir Medical Center (Assaf Harofeh) received $ 8.8 million from the Helmsley Charitable Trust to rebuild and expand the hospital’s cancer institute. The funds will help transform the cancer institute into a state-of-the-art facility, which will be renamed the Hemlmsley Multidisciplinary Oncology Center. The current Cancer Institute is a one-story building built in the […]]]>
Israel’s Shamir Medical Center (Assaf Harofeh) received $ 8.8 million from the Helmsley Charitable Trust to rebuild and expand the hospital’s cancer institute.

The funds will help transform the cancer institute into a state-of-the-art facility, which will be renamed the Hemlmsley Multidisciplinary Oncology Center.

The current Cancer Institute is a one-story building built in the 1980s and is considered obsolete, especially since cancer is one of the most prevalent diseases in the world.

This renovation project will allow it to accommodate more patients and use innovative multidisciplinary cancer treatments. It will also be affiliated with Tel Aviv University.

The current ground floor will be transformed into an outpatient center.

Dividing cancer cell (credit: INGIMAGE)

Two more floors will be added for a treatment clinic and a palliative care facility. In addition, a new level will be built underground to house the hospital’s radiotherapy institute.

“I thank Helmsley for their tremendous support for our new multidisciplinary Helmsley Oncology Center, which is at the heart of our life-saving work,” Shamir Medical Center CEO Dr Osnat Levtzion Korach said in a statement. .

“The Helmsley Multidisciplinary Oncology Center is part of our vision and the broad plan for the development of the medical center in the years to come. With the significant growth in the population around us and the massive housing and development plans for the region, we expect to become Israel’s largest medical center.
With the growing and aging population, there is an urgent need for a larger and more comprehensive cancer center that combines advanced forms of treatment under one roof. This new center will uniquely combine medicine, technology and professionalism with palliative, human and personal care. This generous donation is an important step in making Shamir Medical Center one of the most innovative and innovative hospitals in Israel. “

“We are grateful to the Helmsley Charitable Trust for their generous grant, which will allow us to provide the most advanced cancer care in a new facility that meets the needs of our patients,” explained the director of the cancer institute at Shamir Medical. Center, Dr. Raya Leibowitz.

“It is important for us to provide visitors to the multidisciplinary cancer center not only the best medical and nursing care available, but also a wide range of holistic treatments and services, including emotional and psychological support and social assistance, the all in a spacious and pleasant space that creates a warm and comfortable atmosphere.


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Requiem Mass of the Benedict XVI Institute for the homeless of transcendent beauty | Catholic National Register https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/requiem-mass-of-the-benedict-xvi-institute-for-the-homeless-of-transcendent-beauty-catholic-national-register/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 15:51:36 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/requiem-mass-of-the-benedict-xvi-institute-for-the-homeless-of-transcendent-beauty-catholic-national-register/ What did Christ mean when he told Peter to feed his sheep? What is the Christian’s responsibility towards the poor, and what are the limits of the meaning of poverty and of our moral response to it? Like a suddenly slowed and irregular frame rate designed to refocus our attention during a documentary film, images […]]]>

What did Christ mean when he told Peter to feed his sheep? What is the Christian’s responsibility towards the poor, and what are the limits of the meaning of poverty and of our moral response to it?

Like a suddenly slowed and irregular frame rate designed to refocus our attention during a documentary film, images of the homeless on the streets of downtown San Francisco passed us as we drove toward St. Mary of the Assumption. We were heading to the annual Mass in Remembrance of the Fallen Homeless, brought this year by Frank LaRocca’s musical world premiere. Requiem Mass for the Homeless.

In recent years, Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone and the Archdiocese of San Francisco have started celebrating an annual mass to commemorate the homeless who have died. This year, the event will be reinforced by the artistic efforts of the associates of the Benedict XVI Institute for Sacred Music and Divine Worship.

Worshipers entering the cavernous cathedral would be immediately greeted by a stunning new painting – Patron Saints of the Homeless – by Bernadette Carstensen, the painter in residence of the institute. The painting is situated between modern realism and traditional iconography, representing the saints of suffering (Saints Antoine, Benoît Labre, François, Maximilien Kolbe, Thérèse of Calcutta and Joséphine Bakhita) surrounding Our Lady with Christ in her arms. It is an image of immense and strident strength, which is even more marked when I met the artist, a young mother with clear humility and an almost whispering tone, surrounded by little children who are were wondering why “Mum’s painting” was now in the cathedral.
The opening of the Mass, with an estimated crowd of 400, was signaled by a single note submerged in the organ and strings, humming mournfully as the overwhelming first words of the requiem were sung in a low voice.

A section of the orchestra that performed at the Requiem Mass for the Homeless on November 6 in San Francisco.(Photo: Benedict XVI Institute)DENNIS CALLAHAN2021

As this audible existential moan was supported by female voices and the orchestration became more complete, the music continued plaintively, with a clear and increasing rhythmic propulsion forward and striking harmonic language. Yet even with the full ensemble in stride, the tone and timbre of the work remained dark, in part due to LaRocca’s striking choice to use only the lower strings, removing the standard violin parts. of the score.

The music grew upward and slightly brighter, the violas finally maintaining a higher hum as the sopranos and violas sang in mimicry of the opening lines, with an effect similar to looking through. the mirror and perceive the reality of your own pained and withered face. return (or was it the face of shared guilt?).

Requiem mass of the participants for the homeless
Among the participants in the Requiem Mass were Francscans, Missionaries of Charity and Knights and Dames of Malta.(Photo: Benedict XVI Institute)

The music in this requiem, firmly rooted in the aesthetic magisterium of the Church but clearly reaching new heights, seemed tailor-made not only to mourn the homeless, but to immerse the listener deeply into the painful individual reality of those who were lost in the streets.

During his homily, Bishop Cordileone explained the truly counter-cultural and – in our time, counter-ideological – approach to alleviating the suffering of the poor. Going beyond the short-sighted modern discourse of social justice and institutionalized grievances, he instead spoke forcefully about the misery of the poor and their inherent and equal dignity. The Archbishop also went further by evoking by example the pain caused by the destruction of Jerusalem by the Babylonians and the ensuing spiritual poverty that would accompany their exile and destitution. He said:

“Yet even in the midst of such intense misery, the lamenter finds reason to hope: the Lord’s favors are not exhausted, his mercies are not exhausted. Good is the Lord to him who waits for him, to the soul that seeks him. It is good to silently hope for the saving help of the Lord. The human encounter with love is the way in which God manifests our healthy reason for hope… ”

Yet despite the Archbishop’s homily, the clear aesthetic prompts of LaRocca’s masterful composition, and the new sacred work of art embodying the beauty of the Church in the midst of despair, there were certainly members of the congregation. who could have sensed a mismatch between the splendor of the event and the austere picture outside the church doors.
What about beauty and poverty? Wouldn’t such money be better spent on the poor? The mass included a collection to help the homeless, to ensure their physical and mental well-being.


The charity and the commandment of Christ to feed his sheep extend beyond the temporal and the spiritual, which is why the Church has long recognized and balanced its efforts to this end, in particular by being the greatest patron. beautiful art in the history of mankind until the Second Vatican Council. Yet conflicts abound: like Judas berating the woman with the alabaster jar, the spirit of imminent practicality has always clashed with the human desire – and the Church’s clear call – to create a sacred art of highest quality, with our own time representing the most recent and perhaps most destructive period of iconoclasm and cultural vandalism in Church history.

Yet in a society where a critical percentage of Catholic liturgies are performed irreverently while most Catholics have no notion of their liturgical and artistic heritages, there is indeed great spiritual poverty. In a Church where most congregations do not receive their liturgical heritage – their birthright, which permanently includes sacred art and music – we also face a crisis of spiritual homelessness.
And yet, “the Lord’s favors are not exhausted, his mercies are not exhausted. Good is the Lord to him who waits for him, to the soul that seeks him … “

In this spirit, the Benedict XVI Institute followed the Mass and the first with an intense after-conference with a round table with Archbishop Cordileone, LaRocca and academic William Mahrt. This was followed by interviews with painter-in-residence Carstensen and poet James Matthew Wilson, as well as a searing meditation on physical and spiritual poverty and the global reality of beauty by Anthony Lilles, a faculty member at St Seminary. Patrick, who would say:

“In the eyes of my neighbor, a deep beauty bursts forth that remains undefeated, no matter how many times it has been trampled on or forgotten, even by the person who possesses it. This beauty is what Adam saw when he first opened his eyes to Eve. It is no coincidence that the resurrection of the world depends on the beauty of women. Or that Charles Péguy describes hope as a girl, a little girl. Today this little girl is much needed.

The evening ended with a performance of three choral arrangements from the Tantum Ergo, by Kevin Allen, LaRocca and a world premiere by Bobby Chastain. Then, in a spontaneous moment of festive meditation, one of the youngest conference attendees, violinist Yvette Kraft, began playing Bach, connecting the new and the old in a way that made all things shine.

The next morning, prominent Catholic composers and conductors from across the country gathered to break bread and discuss issues surrounding sacred music in the Church in the United States, as well as ways to streamline relationships. between living composers, conductors, parishes and their music programs. . The concern centered on respecting what Mahrt called The musical form of the liturgy (a highly suggested book, by the way) in a new and vibrant way. It was not a discussion of tradition as a museum piece, but rather of growing tradition as if it were to keep a living fire going. It all felt like a watershed moment.

Beyond the resplendent liturgy, music and the conference that followed, some participants surely saw the issue of homelessness and human dignity represented in a new light. Others, like me, saw it entirely new. A poverty in my understanding had been alleviated, a path to a new understanding was born, and a deep sense of the connection between the beauty of the dignity of the homeless person and the beauty inherent in the deepest expressions of the aesthetic magisterium engendered: all poverty requires an attempt at alleviation.

Note that the Church in its fullest sense is not simply an ambitious NGO, which feeds the poor while offering some corollary religious activities to those who need a little piety in their life. On the contrary, the Church in its truest sense finds its identity in the fullness of the person of Christ, approaching him through the vitality of a reverent and transcendent liturgy where the greatest art is present. Then, carried by this source and this summit, it launches out into the larger world, seeking to alleviate the poverty not only of the body, but also of the spirit and the soul. These were the ambitions of the weekend surrounding the first and after the conference of the Requiem for the homeless, and such are the efforts that Catholics desiring a powerfully transforming Church can now join in supporting.

In the midst of our present darkness, a new Catholic rebirth is being prepared by God, if only we would have it on His terms.


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Azrieli Foundation donates $ 50 million to Weizmann Institute for Neuroscience https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/azrieli-foundation-donates-50-million-to-weizmann-institute-for-neuroscience/ https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/azrieli-foundation-donates-50-million-to-weizmann-institute-for-neuroscience/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 00:23:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/azrieli-foundation-donates-50-million-to-weizmann-institute-for-neuroscience/ The Azrieli Foundation has donated US $ 50 million to the Weizmann Institute of Science and Weizmann Canada, the institute said on Tuesday. The funds will be allocated to the launch of the Azrieli Institute for Brain and Neural Sciences, which will conduct neuroscience research at the Weizmann Institute campus in Rehovot. The new facility […]]]>
The Azrieli Foundation has donated US $ 50 million to the Weizmann Institute of Science and Weizmann Canada, the institute said on Tuesday. The funds will be allocated to the launch of the Azrieli Institute for Brain and Neural Sciences, which will conduct neuroscience research at the Weizmann Institute campus in Rehovot.

The new facility aims to advance research in the field through interdisciplinary cooperation and produce tangible results with “high clinical relevance,” according to Weizmann Canada, which raises funds and organizes events on behalf of the Weizmann Institute. .

“In addition to Weizmann’s outstanding results in the field of science at large, and neuroscience in particular, we are delighted that this new institute facilitates and amplifies collaborative work between 40 groups in several disciplines,” said the president- CEO of the Azrieli Foundation, Dr Naomi Azrieli.

The building will house all of the neuroscience researchers at the Weizmann Institute, who will collaborate to better understand how the brain works and develops, added Weizmann Canada.

The Azrieli Institute plans to focus on several topics, including the development of neural networks, theoretical and computational neuroscience, perception and action, memory and cognition, mental health, brain damage and regeneration, neurodegeneration and the effects of aging on the brain and neurotechnology.

The Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot. (credit: Wikimedia Commons)

“I am confident that this unique new research environment will enable the next big step forward in brain research,” said Prof. Alon Chen, President of the Weizmann Institute.

Although the Azrieli Foundation has shared a partnership with the Weizmann Institute and Weizmann Canada for years, Weizmann Canada has noted that the donation to the Azrieli Institute will be “one of the largest of its kind.”

Weizmann Canada CEO, Susan Stern, expressed her gratitude for the Azrieli Foundation’s donation, as well as for her partnership with her organization, adding that “the foundation’s leadership through this magnanimous new donation will benefit humanity in promoting global collective understanding of the brain ”.


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LGBTQ Victory Institute to Honor Maine House Speaker, Congressman from Guatemala https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/lgbtq-victory-institute-to-honor-maine-house-speaker-congressman-from-guatemala/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/lgbtq-victory-institute-to-honor-maine-house-speaker-congressman-from-guatemala/ Israel’s openly gay Deputy Foreign Minister this week rejected the idea that his country’s government promotes LGBTQ rights in order to distract from its policies towards Palestinians. “I would never, ever put myself in a position where I would be the face of ‘pinkwashing’ in my role because I am convinced that there is no […]]]>

Israel’s openly gay Deputy Foreign Minister this week rejected the idea that his country’s government promotes LGBTQ rights in order to distract from its policies towards Palestinians.

“I would never, ever put myself in a position where I would be the face of ‘pinkwashing’ in my role because I am convinced that there is no such thing in Israel,” Idan Roll said. at the Washington Blade Wednesday during an interview at the Riggs Hotel in downtown DC

Roll, 37, spoke to the Blade at the end of a 4-day trip to Washington, which took place less than six months after eight political parties formed a coalition government that toppled the prime minister longtime Benjamin Netanyahu.

The Knesset earlier this month passed Israel’s first national budget in three years. Roll, who is the youngest person in the Israeli government, told the Blade that he is allocating $ 30 million (NIS 90 million) to LGBTQ organizations across the country.

Health Minister Nitzan Horowitz announced in August that Israel had lifted restrictions on blood donation from men who have sex with men. The Israeli Supreme Court ruled in July that same-sex couples and single men should be allowed to have a child through a surrogate mother.

On November 12, a group of teenagers attacked a group of LGBTQ youth near Jerusalem’s main bus station on their way to a transgender rights conference in Tel Aviv. Neil Patrick Harris is among the actors who have expressed support for the Tel Aviv LGBT International Film Festival amid calls from supporters of the BDS (boycott, economic divestment and sanctions) movement to boycott it because of Israel’s policies towards the Palestinians.

Roll acknowledged that Israel does not extend civil marriage to same-sex couples, but he also pointed out to the Blade that the country also does not have “civil marriage for heterosexuals” because marriage in the Jewish state is a religious institution. Roll noted that he was one of the openly LGBTQ people in the Israeli government and that they “lived full and fulfilled lives.”

“Are we perfect? he asked rhetorically. “No. Are we one of the best places in the world for gay people? Sure, and I feel safe. And I feel welcome. And I feel empowered and I feel the best is. future.

Roll told The Blade that the idea of ​​”pinkwashing” stems from the fact that “not everyone is as informed as others about life in Israel.”

“It is something that is a task of this new government and of our ministry, to better convey the history of Israel, and it is a wonderful, complex and diverse history,” he said.

Roll also stressed that he “would like people to stop pinning one thing against another.”

“The fact that we are doing a great job for LGBTQ equality is not eliminated, erased or canceled just because we also have to deal with a very complex conflict, which is the Israeli-Palestinian conflict,” he said. . “The promotion of progressive values ​​is always something worth mentioning, and we are working to improve the lives of Palestinians in humanitarian and economic terms. Things are not as black and white as they are described.

The separation barrier between Israel and the West Bank seen from a gas station in Bethlehem, West Bank, November 12, 2016. (Washington Blade photo by Michael K. Lavers)

Roll lives in Tel Aviv with her husband, Harel Skaat, an Israeli pop star whom he married in Utah in March, and their two children whom they had through surrogate mothers in the United States.

Lawyer and former model member of the centrist party Yesh Atid founded Pride Front, a group that encourages LGBTQ Israelis to get involved in the country’s political process. Roll told the Blade that he decided to run for office after he and her husband started their family.

“It was quite a struggle,” he said, noting that their second child was born to a surrogate in Oklahoma. “And then I was struck by the fact that I had to practice what I preach. I should not only encourage others to take political action and move forward, but I should also take the lead. “

Roll in 2019 won a seat in the Israeli Knesset. Lapid appointed Roll as deputy foreign minister after the new government took office.

“I am a very young member of this government… and I am an openly gay member of this government,” Roll said. “I am very grateful for the life I have been able to create for myself in Israel. “

“It’s a story that I feel like I can describe in a very authentic way and I think it’s a story that needs to be told outside of Israel,” he added. “I’m also very proud to be part of the new face of a new government that is doing things differently and in a way that I think now allows people of all different ethnicities, colors and agendas to find someone. who they can identify with in this government. . ”

Israeli Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Idan roll (Washington Blade photo by Michael K. Lavers)

US Sens. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.), Jon Ossoff (D-Ga.), Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), Bill Hagerty (R-Tenn.), US Rep. Ritchie Torres (DN.Y.) and other members of the Congressional LGBTQ + Equality Caucus are among those who met Roll when he was in Washington. at George Washington University.

“We have a new government, and the new government is really different in a lot of ways,” Roll told The Blade. “It is the most diverse government in our history and in a way the most diverse reflection of a very diverse society. “

He said one of the reasons he visited Washington was “to reach out and start a dialogue.” Roll also stressed that Israel “has always been a bipartisan issue.

“It is crucial that it stays that way and we intend to do so,” he said. “The United States is the most valuable and important ally we have and you must cultivate a relationship.”



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Determined resident Lizzie sets up new women’s institute for Birchington – The Isle Of Thanet News https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/determined-resident-lizzie-sets-up-new-womens-institute-for-birchington-the-isle-of-thanet-news/ https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/determined-resident-lizzie-sets-up-new-womens-institute-for-birchington-the-isle-of-thanet-news/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 17:00:01 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/determined-resident-lizzie-sets-up-new-womens-institute-for-birchington-the-isle-of-thanet-news/ Lizzie wants to create a fun and positive group for the women of the village A new Birchington Women’s Institute will hold its first meeting this month after determined resident Lizzy Davidson decided to revive the group. While the band won’t be an “official” WI until early next year, Lizzie has decided to put the […]]]>
Lizzie wants to create a fun and positive group for the women of the village

A new Birchington Women’s Institute will hold its first meeting this month after determined resident Lizzy Davidson decided to revive the group.

While the band won’t be an “official” WI until early next year, Lizzie has decided to put the show on the road with meetings booked at Church House this month and next.

The 52-year-old gut wellness coach says the movie Calendar Girls – based on the true story of WI members donning voluptuous buns and Cherry Bakewell for a nude charity calendar – made her think a WI would be amusing.

She said, “Not long after losing my father a few years ago, I asked my mother, ‘Why don’t you join the WI? Sounds like a lot of fun! “. And I also remember thinking to myself that when I was older, I would join in… because yeah, that sounded like a lot of fun!

“After 10 years, I made my first request to join Birchington WI, but alas, it was no longer… I missed the boat.

Birchington actually had two WIs. Birchington WI, formed in 1968, used to meet in the afternoon, but numbers started to drop and it closed a few years ago. There was also the Grenham Bay WI – later taking the name Birchington – which met in the evenings but, with a limited number of members, it ran its course after 50 years and also closed.

Lizzie, who also works at Mandy’s Deli in the village, was not to be upset and decided it was time for Birchington to have another institute for women.

She said, “I had a brain wave, why don’t I resuscitate the WI? I inquired about the creation of a new group and the WI organization gave me the green light.

“I created a Facebook group for those who are interested in staying on top of the plans put in place, and this is where it blew me away… in just a few days we have gained almost 300 members, I don’t literally couldn’t keep up with the join requests.

“I couldn’t believe it, and I still can’t, one minute I was joining… the next minute I was organizing it.”

“There is still a bit of work to be done before we officially start as a WI group, and the responses from the amazing ladies at Birchington with such appreciation and support have been heartwarming. We may not be officially settled until the New Year, but that won’t stop us.

“I want the ladies to look forward to Christmas and step into the New Year knowing that they have a community of like-minded women, that they are making new friends and that they have something positive to look forward to there. ‘next year… and I love every minute of it. “

Meetings will be held at Church House in Kent Gardens on November 23 and December 21 at 7:30 p.m. Then they will take place every first Tuesday of the month.

Lizzie, who lives in the village with her boyfriend Mark and Cocker Spaniel Sampson, 6, is now hoping that many more women will want to join us.

Or send an email to elizabeth@waha.guru

A glimpse into the history of the Women’s Institute

In 1915, the WI was formed in the United Kingdom. It was originally created to revitalize rural communities and encourage women to become more involved in food production during World War I. Since then, the goals of the organization have broadened and WI is now the largest voluntary women’s organization in the UK.

1924 marks the year that the members of WI sang “Jerusalem” for the very first time. It was specially composed for the WI and adopted because of its connection to the suffrage movement – hence the Wis saying about Jerusalem and jam (making).

During World War II, the WI played a vital role in the cultivation and preservation of food and in the care of evacuees.

In the 1950s, after passing a resolution to launch a national anti-waste campaign, the WI and 25 other UK organizations formed the Keep Britain Tidy group.

The WI was in the spotlight in 2003 with the release of Calendar Girls, starring Helen Mirren.

In 2012, the first WI inside a women’s prison was formed

Over the decades, the WI has campaigned on everything from HIV awareness to demanding equal pay.


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Minneapolis Institute of Art’s “Nazi Drawings” Reflect on the Holocaust and the Nature of Evil https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/minneapolis-institute-of-arts-nazi-drawings-reflect-on-the-holocaust-and-the-nature-of-evil/ https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/minneapolis-institute-of-arts-nazi-drawings-reflect-on-the-holocaust-and-the-nature-of-evil/#respond Wed, 27 Oct 2021 13:02:44 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/minneapolis-institute-of-arts-nazi-drawings-reflect-on-the-holocaust-and-the-nature-of-evil/ At first glance, the “Envisioning Evil” exhibit does not appear malicious. Featuring the work of Argentine-American artist Mauricio Lasansky, the show begins with a series of portraits – of his 13-year-old son, Leonardo, with large round black eyes and folded hands; of himself, shown in profile in a high-necked white turtleneck; of a Roman Catholic […]]]>

At first glance, the “Envisioning Evil” exhibit does not appear malicious. Featuring the work of Argentine-American artist Mauricio Lasansky, the show begins with a series of portraits – of his 13-year-old son, Leonardo, with large round black eyes and folded hands; of himself, shown in profile in a high-necked white turtleneck; of a Roman Catholic Cardinal, created during a Guggenheim Fellowship in Spain.

These are just portraits. The evil begins in the adjoining gallery, with its labyrinth-shaped entry for “The Nazi Drawings,” on display at the Minneapolis Institute of Art until next June. In this series of 33 drawings, mostly made between 1961 and 1966, Lasansky takes the horrors of the Holocaust off the page, in your throat and in your guts, where they will simultaneously simmer and stab you.

“He’s so angry, he’s pressing so hard, it feels like his pencils are breaking,” said Rachel McGarry, associate curator at the Minneapolis Institute of Art.

Lasansky was born in Buenos Aires in 1914 to Jewish immigrants. He resided there until 1943 when he moved to the United States and became a well-known printmaker.

His motivation to raise awareness of the Holocaust struck in 1961, when the Jerusalem District Court tried and ultimately executed Adolf Eichmann, a senior Nazi official and one of the main organizers of the Holocaust, who had fled in Argentina and was later captured by Israeli agents.

At the start of the series, the Holocaust was not known as the Nazis’ attempt to genocide the Jewish people, as it is today. Lasansky also wanted to convey the suffering of Roma, Sinti, Poles, Soviet prisoners of war, LGBTQ people and many more. He chose to do it through drawing, a medium that anyone can use.

His drawings toured the United States from 1967 to 1970, with a stop in Mexico City. In 1972, the series was acquired by Richard and Jeanne Levitt of Des Moines, fulfilling Lasansky’s wish that the drawings be kept together.

The 33 larger-than-life drawings are filled with death, often represented by a bare skull taking on the head of a human. In one drawing, a Nazi soldier standing inside a gas chamber raises a bloodied hand in the “Heil Hitler” salute, and a skeleton sitting on his shoulders points the shower towards the youth.

“He’s also playing with erasure, erasing things so that people seem to disappear, people seem to disappear,” McGarry said.

Lasansky also lashes out at the Catholic Church for its inaction as millions of people were murdered in Europe. In one drawing, a stunned pope, standing in a pose a la “Pietà” – generally used to show mourning for the body of Christ – holds a dead and naked child in his arms.

“Many church leaders have failed to speak out,” she said. “Why hasn’t the Pope [Pius XII] speak out? He was in a strong position. “

One of the reasons this show has come to Mia now is the diminishing awareness of the Holocaust among Millennials and Gen Z. In a survey released early last year, 63% believed that the death toll was less than 2 million (the actual total is 6 million). More than half could not name any of the 40,000 concentration camps.

In another drawing, “No. 30”, the artist’s own body becomes possessed and mutilated by a skeleton, as if working on this ten-year series destroys it.

Unlike most exhibits, the artist’s statement comes at the end.

Lasansky, who died in 2012, wrote that dignity is a force by which man survives, and once it is suppressed – as was the case in Nazi Germany – man becomes a self-destructive animal that erases history and poisons the future. Evil can lurk within any of us, he warns, making this series even more haunting and timeless.

Nazi drawings

When: 10 am-5pm Thu-Sun until June 26.

Where: Minneapolis Institute of Art, 2400 3rd Av. S.

Admission fee. Masks strongly encouraged. 888-642-2787 or artsmia.org.


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Promise Armenian Institute and Armenian Film Foundation to Collaborate to Support Armenian Film and Photography at UCLA https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/promise-armenian-institute-and-armenian-film-foundation-to-collaborate-to-support-armenian-film-and-photography-at-ucla/ https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/promise-armenian-institute-and-armenian-film-foundation-to-collaborate-to-support-armenian-film-and-photography-at-ucla/#respond Mon, 25 Oct 2021 17:38:45 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/promise-armenian-institute-and-armenian-film-foundation-to-collaborate-to-support-armenian-film-and-photography-at-ucla/ Western Tourists at the Dome of the Rock, Jerusalem, by Garabed Krikorian, Krikorian Studio, ca 1895, Malikian Collection LOS ANGELES, California – The Armenian Institute of Promise is pleased to announce that it has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Armenian Cinema Foundation (AFF) to collaborate on a series of projects that will support […]]]>
Western Tourists at the Dome of the Rock, Jerusalem, by Garabed Krikorian, Krikorian Studio, ca 1895, Malikian Collection

LOS ANGELES, CaliforniaThe Armenian Institute of Promise is pleased to announce that it has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Armenian Cinema Foundation (AFF) to collaborate on a series of projects that will support Armenian cinema and photography at UCLA.

On November 18, 2021, the Promise Armenian Institute will host “Consequences: the Armenian earthquake of 1988, The first online exhibition of Armenian Image Archives, which will celebrate the work of Asadour Guzelian. Guzelian is a UK-based photographer who visited Armenia shortly after the 1988 earthquake. This Zoom event will feature some of his photographs, which were published in mainstream newspapers at the time.

Earthquake in Armenia (Photo: Asadour Guzelian, 1989, Spitak, Armenia)

The Armenian Image Archive (AIA) is the first of the new collaborations between PAI and AFF. These new archives have three objectives: the preservation, research and exhibition of Armenian photographers and photographs related to the Armenian subject. The AIA will identify collections of photographs from around the world, from the mid-19th century to contemporary collections. It will provide both a repository and an ongoing platform for discourse and study on Armenian photographers.

The Armenian Cinema Foundation was founded by J. Michael Hagopian, Ph.D., who played a decisive role, with NAASR, by creating the first Chair of Armenian Studies at UCLA. Hagopian was a senior lecturer at UCLA before becoming a documentary filmmaker. With its legacy in mind, AFF will support projects at UCLA that link film and photography with a deeper understanding of Armenian history, culture and arts.

Joseph Malikian, Ph.D., an expert in ancient Armenian photography, works closely with AIA. Malikian is the author of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire: an anthology and a photographic history and an upcoming publication The Krikorians on the road to Jaffa.

As a member of Malikian collection, Malikian has collected period images and history from many Armenian photographic studios, dating back to the 1860s, including Abdullah Freres, Sebah, Sebah & Joaillier, Tarkulyan (Atelier Phebus), Iranien, Gulmez Freres, Lekegian, Krikorian, Sarrafian , Alban, Van Léo, Armand, De Mirjian, Karsh and many others. Its collection contains original images from famous Armenian photographic studios in Armenia, Tiflis, Baku and other parts of what was once the Russian Empire.

“The Armenian Image Archive will also identify previously unknown collections from the Armenian Genocide period,” said Carla Garapédian, Ph.D., from AFF. “Over 100 years have passed, but there are still photos that haven’t seen the light of day.

“The Armenian Institute UCLA Promise welcomes this new partnership with the Armenian Film Foundation. The AIA, along with all future projects, will enrich the scientific inquiry into Armenian photography and cinema at UCLA and make available to the public and the academic community images and collections amounting to a national treasure, ”he said. declared the teacher Anne Karagozian, the first director of the Armenian Promise Institute. “I would also like to thank the UCLA Library and the UCLA Film and Television Archives for their important future role in our partnership with AFF. Both organizations are international leaders in the preservation and access to cultural heritage, and their world-class expertise will amplify the work of the Armenian Image Archives to advance our common goals.

The “Consequences: the Armenian earthquake of 1988”The webinar will take place on Thursday, November 18 at 10:00 a.m. PT. Registration is now open in line.

A rare photo from the genocide period, Armenian Film Foundation

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The Weizmann Institute joins the giant Magellan telescope project https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/the-weizmann-institute-joins-the-giant-magellan-telescope-project/ https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/the-weizmann-institute-joins-the-giant-magellan-telescope-project/#respond Sat, 23 Oct 2021 07:53:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/the-weizmann-institute-joins-the-giant-magellan-telescope-project/ The Giant Magellan Telescope Organization (GMTO) hosted the Israel Weizmann Institute of Science in its international consortium of distinguished universities and research institutes that are building the giant telescope last September. The partnership between Israel’s leading multidisciplinary research institution and the Next Generation Telescope Organization reinforces the understanding that the completion of the Giant Magellan […]]]>

The Giant Magellan Telescope Organization (GMTO) hosted the Israel Weizmann Institute of Science in its international consortium of distinguished universities and research institutes that are building the giant telescope last September.

The partnership between Israel’s leading multidisciplinary research institution and the Next Generation Telescope Organization reinforces the understanding that the completion of the Giant Magellan Telescope – the largest and most powerful infrared optical telescope ever developed – is most important. of great importance to the global scientific community.

The telescope is built in the Atacama Desert in Chile, one of the highest and driest regions on the planet. The magnificent conditions should allow a clear view almost every night.

Engineering of the Giant Magellan is underway. The telescope uses seven of the world’s largest mirrors and advanced optical technology to see billions of light years in the universe, providing images at ten times the resolution of the famous Hubble Space Telescope. The revolutionary image quality will allow scientists around the world to explore new clues to the evolution of the universe, including the search for life on distant exoplanets.

Why is the development of telescopes so crucial for scientific progress? It’s important to remember that just 100 years ago, scientists thought that the “Milky Way” was the entire universe, the only galaxy in the world. However, the 1920s brought Edwin Hubble (hence the name of the Hubble Telescope), who used his famous 100-inch telescope to determine that the universe actually contained multiple galaxies.

The Koffler accelerator, Weizmann Institute of Science (credit: WEIZMANN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE)

While the discoveries made by new telescope technology are impressive, perhaps most impressive of all is how these telescopes will help us answer the universe’s toughest questions: “Are we alone?” being the leader among them. The Giant Magellanic Telescope can help us answer this.

“Joining the GMTO consortium is a huge step forward for the Weizmann Institute of Science,” according to Professor Avishay Gal-Yam, director of the Deloro Center for Space and Optics at the Weizmann Institute. “It is a privilege to join a global team at the forefront of astrophysics research, which will allow us to accelerate our own observatory capacities, to develop instruments that will improve the way in which the main astrophysics teams of the world explore the universe and share their expertise with the best partners. in the field of astrophysics.

Before becoming the 13th official member of the GMTO project, Weizmann’s professors helped generate one of the first scientific instruments for the Giant Magellanic Telescope: a spectrograph designed to study Earth-like planets light years away.

“The addition of the Weizmann Institute of Science is a great victory for our international consortium,” said Walter Massey, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the GTMO. “We just got stronger and more capable. Their expertise is essential to the mission to point the world’s greatest mirrors to the heavens and unveil its many cosmic secrets.


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Shalom Hartman Institute and JCRC / AJC assemble new leadership group after successful pilot project https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/shalom-hartman-institute-and-jcrc-ajc-assemble-new-leadership-group-after-successful-pilot-project/ https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/shalom-hartman-institute-and-jcrc-ajc-assemble-new-leadership-group-after-successful-pilot-project/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/shalom-hartman-institute-and-jcrc-ajc-assemble-new-leadership-group-after-successful-pilot-project/ Members of the cohort pictured with mentors Rebecca Starr, Rabbi Asher Lopatin and JCRC / AJC Associate Director Lauren Garfield-Herrin. (JCRC / AJC) A new group of nearly two dozen lay leaders will soon begin their apprenticeship as the second DCLP cohort, with several members of the first cohort serving as mentors. In 2019, the […]]]>
Members of the cohort pictured with mentors Rebecca Starr, Rabbi Asher Lopatin and JCRC / AJC Associate Director Lauren Garfield-Herrin. (JCRC / AJC)

A new group of nearly two dozen lay leaders will soon begin their apprenticeship as the second DCLP cohort, with several members of the first cohort serving as mentors.

In 2019, the Shalom Hartman Institute (SHI) opened an office in Detroit with support from the William Davidson Foundation.

At that time, Detroit was one of many Jewish communities in North America striving to engage and strengthen Jewish community life, a sense of belonging to a people, and to understand the changing nature of relations between Israel. and American Jews.

Founded in Israel, SHI is a center for transformative thinking and teaching that addresses the major challenges facing the Jewish people today and uplifts Jewish life in Israel and around the world.

SHI North America hired Rebecca Starr to oversee the Midwestern office and her role in the organization has changed as she is also director of regional programs.

When Hartman started bringing ideas and researchers to the Detroit community, they organized four cohort groups. These included educators and rabbis, community professionals and the local Jewish Funders Network.

The fourth cohort was established as a pilot program in partnership with the Jewish Community Relations Council / American Jewish Committee (JCRC / AJC). The Detroit Community Leadership Program (DCLP) invited applicants to apply to be part of a diverse cohort of the most influential Jewish lay leaders in the Detroit metro area.

Rabbi Asher Lopatin
Rabbi Asher Lopatin

The goal of this group, led by scholars from the Shalom Hartman Institute, was to define a conceptual framework for understanding the relationship between Israel and the Jewish community in North America, to arbitrate the tone and content of a complex community discourse, and bring what they learned to the organizations and institutions in which they hold leadership positions.

“The JCRC / AJC is delighted to partner with the Shalom Hartman Institute of North America over the past two years,” said Rabbi Asher Lopatin, Executive Director of JCRC / AJC.

“It is essential that we support community leaders in their study of how Jewish sources and traditions lead to the values ​​and advocacy that the Jewish community and our organization support for the world at large. “

Audrey Bloomberg and Rebecca Starr
Audrey Bloomberg and Rebecca Starr JCRC / AJC
A successful cohort

During the first few months of DCLP, participants had the opportunity to meet and learn in person alongside visiting scholars such as SHI leaders Elana Stein Hain and Lauren Berkun. However, once the pandemic began, the format and goals of the program changed as the sessions were held solely on Zoom, and the trip the group planned to take to Israel in June 2020 with other leaders from across the country. North America has been canceled.

To pivot in the midst of this challenge, the Jewish community conversation developed under these changing circumstances, with participants expanding their conversations to include issues that arose in the wake of the pandemic and the difficult political situations in Israel and the United States. United.

The work has shifted from a focus on Israel exclusively to work that has helped leaders think about the role of leaders in times of crisis.

“Being part of the Detroit Community Leadership Program has exceeded my expectations,” said Audrey Bloomberg, a member of this first cohort.

“I feel so lucky to have participated over the past two years in thoughtful conversations not only with academics, but also with other Detroiters who have all worked in our community. Especially during the pandemic, getting together with my cohort gave me the opportunity to connect with my community in a deeply meaningful way and gave me a break to think about our community from a different perspective. “

She added, “As a volunteer and working in our Jewish community, getting involved in Hartman work has given me the space and the place to think in a different way. Due to my involvement with DCLP, I began to engage with other resources provided by Hartman, such as podcasts.

“I cannot recommend enough that individuals check out the podcasts, virtual summits and articles produced by Hartman. You don’t have to be a cohort to experience Hartman Torah.

Rebecca Starr speaks with cohort members at the first cohort meeting in August.
Rebecca Starr speaks with cohort members at the first cohort meeting in August. JCRC / AJC
New group coming soon

A new group of nearly two dozen lay leaders will soon begin their apprenticeship as the second DCLP cohort, with several members of the first cohort serving as mentors.

Rebecca Starr said, “The Institute is delighted to welcome this incredible group of leaders to the new local cohort. Our work together will provide an opportunity to explore our complex relationship with Israel as the Jews of North America.

Alicia Chandler
Alicia Chandler

“This moment in Jewish history is one that requires study, debate and conversation around the future of the Jewish people,” Starr added.

“I look forward to learning with this DCLP group, as well as Hartman’s other local cohorts of professional leaders throughout the year, and seeing them bring their wisdom to the larger Jewish community in Metro Detroit.”

This year’s topic of study for the cohort includes time spent bringing Jewish values ​​into conversations about Israel. As participants begin their learning, they will explore the ways in which their relationship with Israel unites and divides and how deep polarization affects their work as community leaders.

Each participant will have the opportunity to engage with new ideas and make them work in the institutions they represent.

Participants will meet in person at various locations in the community, and on Zoom for some sessions, and have opportunities for reflection. In June, travel permitting, they will spend an intensive weeklong seminar on the Hartman campus in Jerusalem.

Jon aaron
Jon aaron

Alicia Chandler, outgoing JCRC / AJC president, helped design the DCLP in 2019 and will now be part of the new cohort.

“I am so delighted to be able to participate in this experience through Shalom Hartman. Hartman is the Jewish community’s thought leader on issues of pluralism and Israel-Diaspora relations and it’s so exciting that this learning has been brought to Detroit. “

Jon Aaron, cohort participant, added: “I am delighted and honored to be able to learn with and from some of the greatest minds in the Jewish world. The Shalom Hartman Institute has become the preferred destination for the dissemination of Jewish thought and ideas.

“The Detroit Hartman Cohort brought together some of Detroit’s wisest Jewish individuals and leaders and provided me with the opportunity to learn and develop my Jewish identity alongside these remarkable individuals,” adds Aaron.D.

“I look forward to increasing my Jewish awareness and being able to share my newfound wisdom with my wife and children. “

For more information on the Shalom Hartman Institute and DCLP, visit www.hartman.org.il/program/detroit/ or email Rebecca Starr at rebecca.starr@shalomhartman.org. For more information on the JCRC / AJC, visit www.jcrcajc.org or email Associate Director Lauren Garfield-Herrin at herrin@jfmd.org.

Second cohort of the Detroit Community Leadership Program:

Jonathan aaron

Brad Axelrod

Alicia Chandler

Michael curhan

Suzan curhan

Andrew Doctoroff

Ken Gold

Ryan hertz

Jeffrey Klein

Susan klein

Jodie Krasnick

Ellen lipton

Marc Lipton

Beth margolin

Steve Margolin

Andi Nitzkin

Sarah roberts

Larry winer

younger michelle


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The Boris Currency Institute inaugurates the Matanel Garden https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/the-boris-currency-institute-inaugurates-the-matanel-garden/ https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/the-boris-currency-institute-inaugurates-the-matanel-garden/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sustainable-jerusalem.org/the-boris-currency-institute-inaugurates-the-matanel-garden/ “Green Naftali” is an innovative environmental project at the Naftali building of Tel Aviv University that combines interdisciplinary research, circular economy concepts and advanced environmental thinking. The project aims to make the Naftali building, home of the Gershon H. Gordon Faculty of Social Sciences at Tel Aviv University, energy neutral with a zero carbon footprint, […]]]>

“Green Naftali” is an innovative environmental project at the Naftali building of Tel Aviv University that combines interdisciplinary research, circular economy concepts and advanced environmental thinking. The project aims to make the Naftali building, home of the Gershon H. Gordon Faculty of Social Sciences at Tel Aviv University, energy neutral with a zero carbon footprint, water neutral and waste neutral.

On October 17, at 3:00 p.m. Israel time, 8:00 a.m. EST and 12:00 p.m. UK time, the Boris Mints Institute at Tel Aviv University will inaugurate the first installment of the project, the Matanel Garden, which is a vertical wall and a horizontal garden on the ground. The garden, which was built with a generous donation from the Matanel Foundation, includes the Green Wall, a vertical garden of 250 square meters that reduces the building’s energy consumption and a horizontal garden, which will serve as a learning and research center. . Biological pest control technologies, water recycling and renewable energies will be applied to the garden.

The Matanel Garden will include several research elements, including a monitoring system that will monitor energy and water inputs and outputs, thus evaluating the effectiveness of the various technologies used in the project, energy consumption and footprint. building carbon.

The Matanel Garden (Tel Aviv University)

At the opening of the Garden, the President of Tel Aviv University, Professor Ariel Porat and Professor Itai Sened, Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences Gershon H. Gordon and Director of BMI, will greet you and a representative of the Matanel Foundation will address the assembly. after the unveiling of the Garden plaque. Professor Hadas Mamane, head of the environmental engineering program at the Faculty of Engineering, will speak about the overall research plan of the Green Naftali project.

The Boris Mints Institute is part of the School of Social and Political Studies at Tel Aviv University in Ramat Aviv and was founded by Dr Boris Mints in 2015 to encourage research, planning and innovative thinking to to promote meaningful positive change in the world. The Institute focuses on providing detailed strategic plans for implementation to decision makers around the world, based on research conducted by top researchers and students in five research labs: Inequality, Renewable Energy, Sustainable Development, Water and Conflict Resolution. The Boris Mints Institute also awards the annual Boris Mints Award, a $ 100,000 prize to academics helping solve global strategic challenges.
For more information and to register for the event, please click here.

This article was written in collaboration with the Boris Mints Institute.


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